Minorities in Pakistan

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Research Project
International Human Rights Law

| Topic | |Plight of Christians in Pakistan and | |Suggestions for their uplift |

Submitted to Dr. Ehtisham Anwar
Dated: 25/Dec /2010 Submitted By: Group Members: Farhan Khalid 9108

Ubaid Hassan 12106
Fakhar Zaman 10726
Nawab Ali Khan 10798
Rehan Ali 9133

Background:
Minority Rights Group International, a watchdog organization, ranked Pakistan last year as the world’s top country for major increases in threats to minorities from 2007 along with Sri Lanka, which is embroiled in civil war. The group lists Pakistan as seventh on the list of 10 most dangerous countries for minorities, after Somalia, Sudan, Afghanistan, Iraq, Myanmar and Congo. Following is the list of major minority groups living in Pakistan. 1. Christians

2. Sikhs
3. Hindus
4. Other religious groups
.

Security concerns of religious minority groups in Pakistan:

‘In Pakistan today there is a lot of feeling of fear by all the minorities,’ said the Rev. Richard D’Souza of St. Jude Church in Karachi. ‘We feel we have no protection.’ Hindu Panchayat, representing Hindus. ‘We worry about the future of our families and our children here in Pakistan all of us (minorities) do today.’ ‘What are we to do? We have nothing,’ Singh said. ‘We have asked the government of Pakistan either relocate us to somewhere safe or send us to India.’

Editorials in local newspapers have warned of the threat to minorities and predicted that the brutality will eventually reach the larger population. In an April 2-009 letter to the prime minister and president, Lahore Archbishop Lawrence Saldanha said allowing Islamic law in the violent Swat Valley would give license to ‘trigger-happy Taliban (and further) erode constitutional protections for minorities and women.’

Christians:

‘In Pakistan today there is a lot of feeling of fear by all the minorities,’ said the Rev. Richard D’Souza of St. Jude Church in Karachi. ‘We feel we have no protection.’ As the Taliban gains a stronger foothold in Pakistan, increasingly violent assaults against religious minorities are further evidence of its growing power and influence. While the Taliban does not carry out all of the attacks, extremist elements inspired by the group will sometimes act in its name. These attacks add to the instability of an already highly unstable country and also show how Pakistan, supposed to be a US ally in the fight against Islamic extremism, is now itself increasingly threatened by extremists. In dozens of interviews from all over the country, Christians, Sikhs and Hindus told of attacks and threats and expressed an overwhelming sense of fear. Minority Rights Group International, a watchdog organization, ranked Pakistan last year as the world’s top country for major increases in threats to minorities from 2007 along with Sri Lanka, which is embroiled in civil war. The group lists Pakistan as seventh on the list of 10 most dangerous countries for minorities, after Somalia, Sudan, Afghanistan, Iraq, Myanmar and Congo. ‘In Pakistan today there is a lot of feeling of fear by all the minorities,’ said the Rev. Richard D’Souza of St. Jude Church in Karachi. ‘We feel we have no protection.’ Shahbaz Bhatti, Pakistan’s minister for minorities’ affairs said the government is trying to stop the Taliban through military operations. ‘I don’t say minorities are not worried. They have a...
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