Mcdonalds Npv Projects

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[February 3 2011]
Analysis of the future |

Fast-Food industry
The fast food industry in Canada is like no other in the world. Canada has long been a country of indulging and not caring about consequences. Stats Canada published that in 2004, 23.1% of the Canadian population was overweight. It has also been noted that the obesity rate seen a sharp increase during 1978 to 1980. The fast food industry did begin in the early part of the 1950’s, but didn’t truly take off till the 1980’s. In around the 1980’s the use of intercom communication started to gain interest for the use of Drive-thru windows, and during this same time obesity started to climb. The fast food industry has exploded in the last ten years, mainly because more Canadians are stating they don’t have enough time to cook. The average preparation time of a meal in Canada has declined from 44 minutes in 1996 to just 21 minutes in 2004. As we as a country become more and more fast paced. The Fast-Food industry gains more and more appeal. As the times change so do our choices, and more Canadians are looking for healthier choices while living a fast paced life. In 2008 the three most commonly visited restaurants in Canada were McDonalds, Tim Hortons, and Subway. Subway is growing rapidly in Canada because of its convenience and somewhat healthier choice in diet. Food Service Industry Sale Overview

As of 2008, there were 20,248.4 full service restaurants in Canada and 10,525.0 Restaurants with limited service with the total commercial foodservice restaurants (including institutional foodservices, retail foodservices, and other foodservices) totaling 58,904.02 in the Canadian marketplace (Ministry of Agriculture Food & Rural Affairs). Food Expenditure in Canada Overview (all stats from Food Expenditure in Canada 2001 published by Statistics Canada): 2001 households spend an average of $124 per week on food in stores or restaurants. 60% of this was in table-service restaurants compared to 25% in fast-food restaurants (including take-out). All income groups dined out more however there were differences with men who lived alone spending the most on restaurant food purchases compared to families or lone-parent families. Food purchased from restaurants for fast food in Canada was 5.57 percent with the most being consumed in the Atlantic Region at 12.75 percent compared to the lowest being in the Prairie region at 10.59 percent. The Meal type most purchased out by Canadians is Breakfasts with the highest being 16.46 percent in the Atlantic region compared to the Prairie Region at 8.54.

Meal TypeCanadaAtlantic RegionQuebecOntarioPrairie RegionBritish Columbia Breakfasts4.3716.469.228.698.548.61
Lunches3.9211.758.198.017.688.52
Dinners3.539.957.337.366.267.83
Snacks5.4413.0211.7312.0810.8911.78
Fast Food1.503.893.742.473.113.78
Table-Service1.685.523.523.083.333.94
Other Restaurants2.416.626.164.155.215.01

Canadian households have spend the same amount on food in 2001 as in 1996 30 cents of Canadian household food expenses went to restaurant meals (up from 28 cents five years earlier) 2001 $38.00 per week were spend in restaurants by Canadian households compared to $86.00 on food purchased in stores. Weekly spending on food ranged from an average of $66 for incomes less than $20,000 up to $203 for households with incomes of $80,000 or more. Individuals in the highest income group purchased meals from restaurants on average twice a week compared to once a week for those in the lowest income group. Across Canada weekly food spending ranged fro $109 on average in the Atlantic Provinces to $132 in British Columbia.

Focus on Specific Food Service Franchise in Canada-McDonalds McDonalds in Canada is ranked number three in the world for food statistics (amount of food sold per capita per $GDP) at 0.352 per 10,000 population (according to www.NationMaster.com). Only the United States (ranked number...
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