Marketing Mix and Their Problems with Examples with Sou Lotions

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Marketing Mix
Marketing Mix is a combination of marketing tools that a company uses to satisfy their target customers and achieving organizational goals. McCarthy classified all these marketing tools under four broad categories: ▪ Product

▪ Price
▪ Place
▪ Promotion
These four elements are the basic components of a marketing plan and are collectively called 4 P’s of marketing. 4 P’s pertain more to physical products  than services.  Below is an illustration for marketing mix.

The important thing to note is that all these four P’s (variable) are controllable, subject to internal and external constraints of marketing environment. Marketers, using different blends of these variables, can target different group of customers having different needs. So, a customer may call  marketing  mix “the offering”.

Product

Product is the actual offering by the company to its targeted customers which also includes value added stuff. Product may be tangible (goods) or intangible (services). While formulating the marketing strategy, product decisions include: ▪ What to offer?

▪ Brand name
▪ Packaging
▪ Quality
▪ Appearance
▪ Functionality
▪ Accessories
▪ Installation
▪ After sale services
▪ Warranty

Price

Price includes the pricing strategy of the company for its products. How much customer should pay for a product? Pricing strategy not only related to the profit margins but also helps in finding target customers. Pricing decision also influence the choice of marketing channels. Price decisions include: ▪ Pricing Strategy (Penetration, Skim, etc)

▪ List Price
▪ payment period
▪ Discounts
▪ Financing
▪ Credit terms
Using price as a weapon for rivals is as old as mankind. but it’s risky too. Consumers are often sensitive for price, discounts and additional offers. Another aspect of pricing is that expensive products are considered of good quality.

Place (Placement)

It not only includes the place where the product is placed,  all those activities performed by the company to ensure the availability of the product tot he targeted customers. Availability of the product at the right place, at the right time and in the right quantity is crucial in placement decisions. Placement decisions include:

▪ Placement
▪ Distribution channels
▪ Logistics
▪ Inventory
▪ Order processing
▪ Market coverage
▪ selection of channel members

Promotion

Promotion includes all communication and selling activities to pursuade future prospects to buy the product. Promotion decisions include: ▪ Advertising
▪ Media Types
▪ Message
▪ Budgets
▪ Sales promotion
▪ Personal selling
▪ Public relations
▪ Direct marketing
As these costs are huge as compared to product price, So it’s good to perform a break-even analysis before allocating the budget. It helps in determining whether the new customers are worth of promotion cost or not.

It often takes time and requires market research to develop a successful marketing mix. You should not depend on one mix always try new mixes. While designing the mix, make changes to all mixes in such a way that all conveys the same message. Don’t confuse your customers by just changing one variable and keeping the rest same

Market Segmentation?

Market segmentation is a marketing strategy that involves dividing a broad target market into subsets of consumers who have common needs and applications for the relevant goods and services. Depending on the specific characteristics of the product, these subsets may be divided by criteria such as age and gender, or other distinctions, like location or income. Marketing campaigns can then be designed and implemented to target these specific customer segments.

What is the product market expansion grid?

Ian Ansoff has proposed a useful framework called the product/market expansion grid for detecting new intensive growth opportunities. There are four strategies, one for each of the quadrants: Market...
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