Manuel Munoz

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Joshua Brown
English 101-A03
June 30, 2012
Reading Response 4 – Manuel Munoz, “Leave Your Name at the Border” (71-75). In “Leave Your Name at the Border” Manuel Munoz states that he is a Mexican American living in a small California town. Growing up, he and his peers spoke English at school and Spanish at home. Munoz writes about how American names are becoming more popular among immigrant Mexicans. RR4 Munoz Page 2 Response

In “Leave Your Name at the Border,” Manuel Munoz describes how people today "leave their name at the border" which means they change their name and assimilate a new culture. Many people have changed their Spanish names to English names, not to give in to society, but to try and feel included by having an English name. I believe assimilation is different from giving in, because to me assimilation means to absorb information and ideas from a different culture. When people assimilate to a new culture they are not giving in, they are just trying to feel "included" in to the society; they may change some of their ways to feel included.  For example Munoz explains how people change their Spanish names to English names or parents give their children English names, they do this because it is easier for that person to have an English name in America rather than having a Spanish name which some people wouldn't be able to pronounce. Munoz makes an interesting statement, "It's intriguing to watch "American" names begin to dominate among my nieces and nephews and second cousins, as well as with the children of my hometown"(72). Works Cited

Munoz, Manuel. “Leave Your Name at the Border.” The McGraw-Hill Reader. Ed. Gilbert H. Muller. 11th Ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill Learning Solutions, 2011. 71-75. Print.
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