Littoral Anti-Submarine Warfare Concept

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LITTORAL ANTI-SUBMARINE
WARFARE CONCEPT
 

 
 Naval Doctrine Command
1 May 1998

Table of Contents
Executive Summary
Purpose ans Scope
Littoral ASW
Coordinated, Multiplatform ASW Concept
Capabilities and Constraints
Conclusions and Recommendations
Introduction
Purpose
Background
National Objectives
Joint and Naval Objectives
Littoral ASW Objectives
Anticipated Battlespace and Adversaries "The ASW Challenge
Introduction
The Environment
Threat Assessment
Stealth
Mobility and Endurance
Sensors
Weapons
Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) Operational Proficiency
Summary
Littoral ASW
Missions and Tasks
ASW Missions
Littoral ASW Tasks
Littoral ASW Today
Realities & Imperatives
Future Operational Concept
Peacetime: Deterrence and Conflict Prevention
Crisis-to-War
Littoral ASW into the 21st Century
Coordinated, Multiplatform ASW
Future Operational Capabilities
Material and Weapons
Organization, Training and Doctrine
Missions and Task for Future Littoral ASW
Recommendations and Epilogue
Recommendations
Epilogue
 
List of Figures
Figure 1. Mission Support Pyramid
Figure 2. Strategic Foundation
Figure 3. The Relationship of ASW to the Tenets of Joint Vision 2010 Figure 4. Asymetric Threat Risk Analysis
Figure 5. Littoral ASW Mission, Operational tasks and Infrastructure Tasks Figure 6. Defense-in-Depth Options
Figure 7. Future Missions, Operational Tasks and Infrastructure Tasks

Executive Summary
"He who will not apply new remedies must expect new evils." Sir Francis Bacon Purpose and Scope.
This paper provides a Fleet perspective for development of future operational capabilities for littoral anti-submarine warfare (ASW). It is an ASW warfighting concept. It is directed at flag and civilian leadership within the DoN, scientific, technological and acquisition communities to provide Navy ASW goals. These goals must then be assessed, modified and attained through a concept implementation process. This concept reflects the fusion of both the operational and technical communities to define future operational methods and capabilities to conduct successful ASW. It recognizes that new warfighting capabilities result from the co-evolution of innovative technology, doctrine and training. The description focuses on operations about 15 years from today (years 2010 to 2015). This time frame required the analyses to consider present-day technology, operations, and scenarios, but permitted inclusion of new concepts, capabilities and likely mandates. It looks beyond current Navy plans and the program of record, focusing on future operational capabilities required by the U.S. Navy to enable and support future joint operations beyond 2010. Many ASW capabilities and assets are applicable to both littoral waters and the open-ocean. The challenges of each area are different, and in some cases, require unique capabilities. This paper limits its discussions to the littoral environment, forces and operations. However, the narrow scope of this concept is not intended to imply that open-ocean ASW is a solved problem. Open-ocean ASW remains a difficult task with many issues in common with littoral ASW and also many issues unique to open-ocean operations. The concept focuses on those capabilities required by the US Navy to conduct littoral ASW missions. Complementary capabilities required of allied or joint forces are not detailed. When mentioned, specific systems are described only to help illustrate an idea or the effect a system�s capability might have on the ASW concept described. Littoral ASW

Littoral ASW operations protect naval forces, commercial and logistics shipping from enemy submarines, and thereby enable naval forces to project power ashore, conduct strategic sealift operations, and control or interdict sea lines of communications (SLOCs) that affect littoral objectives. In the context of US joint force operations, successful littoral ASW clears the...
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