Life Affirmation

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Life affirmation is the process by which someone comes to appreciate the pleasures of life by accepting death and dying as a harsh reality from Mother Nature. This acceptance actually makes one have a different perspective of life and death. By accepting ones mortality, the mixed and eerie feelings of fear, sadness and anger give greater meaning to life and consequently make it all more precious. It is a reminder that that life is temporal, and hence, we should appreciate our existence but still acknowledge our non existence. These are the two sides of one coin that Mother Nature gave us, but many do not pose for even a second and look at what awaits them over the other side. To further postulate, I will describe the human life cycle, according to Daniel Levinson. His developmental theory consists of stages that are universal and extend from infancy stage to the elderly state. Daniel based his interviews on 40 men who were aged between 35 to 40 years and worked in different professions. He came up with a model that had five stages, namely the infancy stage (age 0-12), the pre-adulthood (ages 12-17), the elderly adulthood stage (age 17-45), the middle adult stage (age40-65) and the late adulthood (ages above 65). He identified the infancy stage as that where one had no cognitive senses and had no major decisions to make in life. Most of the experiences are basically learning and exploratory. In the pre-adulthood stage, there is acknowledgement of oneself and one is in a position to make preliminary choices of life. In the early adulthood stage, one makes initial choices in issues regarding the careers, love life, friendship that lasts long as well as lifestyle. Changes occur in life and one struggles to create a niche for himself in the society. One is cautious about progressing in life, majorly career accomplishments and family wellbeing. At this particular level, one is faced with many roles like parenting. When someone hits around 45, one starts to realize the parts in life that were neglected, and many try to make things right at this stage. In the late adulthood stage, a man appends most of his time reflecting on his past experiences, regrets as well as achievements. This is the stage where one creates peace with oneself and others, including God. Understanding life affirmation is very important. As illustrated by the life stages of human development, many people move from childhood to adulthood without enthusiasm and optimism. When they reach later stages of their lives, they become more cautious as they come to terms with the reality of death. Life affirmation helps one to come to terms with the harsh reality but rarely acknowledged death. By so doing, one has the chance to appreciate life, while preparing for the unexpected appearance of the grim reaper at any moment. Life affirmation has got connections with humanities. In popular arts, death has been and still will be a popular art subject. It is depicted in many ways and such presentations are a form of life affirming tactic. In the golfer and the apple strudel, death is portrayed in a comical way such that it turns the highly dreaded fear into a source of enlightenment. Mythology is another source of death transcendence. In the Lord of the Rings, the Greek myth speaks of a field where the slain warriors live forever. However, in most arts, it is medicalized. The death will occur in a hospital where one is under the care of nurses and doctors. This brings out the picture that when the Grim reaper knocks the door, everything will be done to prevent make him abort his mission. It shows that death will never be left to chance. The song, Death and Transfiguration, by Strauss is an excellent example of how death is masked within the music. The portrayal of death in literature has undergone a transition. Until the middle ages, death was represented as a natural part of life that was highly anticipated. The Greeks, for...
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