Just Do It

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Mac Farber
Paper #2 – Rhetorical Analysis
Jennifer Freed
Just Do It
Sharad Haksar’s Just Do It is part of his very moving series of pictures he calls “Brand Irony.” This series portrays ironic juxtapositions of world-renowned brands combined with interesting visuals. In this specific picture, Haskar shows Nike’s famous Swoosh accompanied by its “Just Do It” slogan on a wall acting as an advertisement somewhere in India. On the wall next to the ad, a young boy is urinating as a little dog looks on. At first a feeling of excitement comes over the viewer because of Nike’s large media presence and its ties to athleticism. The boy urinating next to the slogan seems to then invoke a feeling of humor. These emotions soon give way, however, to a much deeper and serious analysis. Soon enjoyment and wittiness turn into anger and sadness as the details of the image slowly come forward.

Born in India, Sharad Haksar was probably accustomed to seeing this kind of situation day in and day out. For this reason, Haksar was surely biased in the way that he definitely had some kind of disgust with companies like Nike. He is trying to appeal to the same audience Nike would be trying to attract in their advertisements. This would be, for the most part, young and active people anywhere from the ages 15-40. More than that, he is also trying to appeal to anyone who has an interest in photography, advertising, and the worldwide problem of worker exploitation. He finished up his collection of photos entitled “Brand Irony” in 2006. These photos were meant to show big-market companies advertising in ironic situations and/or places. In this specific photo, his frustration with large corporations exploiting their workers seems to be the focal point. Nike is a world –power when it comes to brand imagery, and their “Just Do It” slogan is as recognizable as any. By combining the first glance humor of a boy urinating on a wall, with the more profound message hidden...
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