Jetblue

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 199
  • Published : April 19, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Strategic Report for JetBlue Airways

Harkness Consulting
Innovation through Collaboration
Rosanna Smart Alisher Saydalikhodjayev Sayre Craig April 14, 2007

Table of Contents

Executive Summary ………………………………………………..3 Company History ………………………………….………………..4 Competitive Analysis ………………………………………………7 Internal Rivalry …………………………………………………………. 8 Entry ………………………………………………………………………… 9 Substitutes and Complements …………………………………….. 11 Supplier Power ………………………………………………………….. 12 Buyer Power …………………………………………………............... 13

Financial Analysis ………………………………………………….14 SWOT Analysis ………………………………………………………23 Strategic Issues and Recommendations …………………..25 References ……………………………………………………………30        

Harkness Consulting

2

  Executive Summary
From  its  initial  flight  in  February  2000,  JetBlue  emerged  into  the  heavily  competitive  airline  industry  as  the  little  airline  that  could.  While  legacy  carriers  declared  bankruptcy,  JetBlue  trounced its competition by offering low‐cost, customer‐focused service. Under the direction of  the energetic David Neeleman, JetBlue became a major player in the airline industry. Operating  domestic  flights  on  a  point‐to‐point  system,  JetBlue  primarily  manages  East‐West  and  Northeast‐Southeast  routes.  While  this  route  structure  initially  proved  profitable  for  the  company, rising costs and heated price competition are currently threatening JetBlue’s market  share. The company’s stock price has dropped drastically since reaching a high of over $30 in  2004.  Currently  priced  at  less  than  half  its  52‐week  high,  JetBlue  must  take  serious  strategic  action in order to reinvigorate its business.    After working with low‐fare carrier Southwest, a touch‐screen airline reservation company, and  a  small  upstart  airline  in  Canada,  David  Neeleman  transformed  his  brainchild,  JetBlue,  into  reality.  Neeleman  based  his  airline  around  five  core  values:  safety,  caring,  fun,  integrity,  and  passion. With the pledge to “bring humanity back to air travel,” Neeleman wanted his business  to follow altruistic‐sounding values in order to make air travel a more pleasant experience for  customers and employees. However, at some point in JetBlue’s operating history, the emphasis  on customer satisfaction came at the cost of profits.    It is very challenging for a company to remain successful in the airline industry. A company can  achieve  profits  only  by  maintaining  low  costs  in  what  has  become  an  extremely  price  competitive  domestic  market.  High  internal  rivalry  and  buyer  power  combine  to  drive  ticket  prices  down  to  marginally  profitable  levels.  At  the  same  time,  airlines  are  subject  to  ever‐ increasing fuel and aircraft maintenance costs. Part of JetBlue’s financial struggle in past years  results  from  the  company’s  lack  of  a  sustainable  strategy  to  manage  these  expenses.  The  company  originally  had  lower  costs  than  industry  average  due  to  its  young  aircraft,  young 

Harkness Consulting

3

aircraft  crew,  and  single‐type  aircraft  fleet.  However,  as  their  operating  aircraft  and  crewmembers age, JetBlue cannot maintain its previous cost advantage.  JetBlue recognizes the need for change. Under new CEO David Barger, the airline has recently  entered  into  a  number  of  new  ventures.  Since  2007,  JetBlue  has  established  an  industry‐first  strategic  partnership  with  Aer  Lingus,  instituted  refundable  fares,  and  sold  a  19%  stake  in  JetBlue  to  Lufthansa.  With  the  Open  Air  Act  bridging  the  skies  between  Europe  and  the  US,  these  ventures  offer  future  avenues  for  strategic  alliances.  However,  expansion  plans  will  not  solve the fundamental operating problems that JetBlue experiences, and this is the area where  Harkness Consulting will focus its attention.     In  this  report,  Harkness  Consulting ...
tracking img