Jan Lokpal Bill

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Jan Lokpal Bill
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Jan Lokpal Bill, also referred to as the citizens' ombudsman bill, is a proposed independent anti-corruption law in India. Anti-corruption social activists proposed it as a more effective improvement to the original Lokpal bill, which is currently being proposed by the Government of India.[1] The Jan Lokpal Bill aims to effectively deter corruption, redress grievances of citizens, and protect whistle-blowers. If made into law, the bill would create an independent ombudsman body called theLokpal (Sanskrit: protector of the people). It would be empowered to register and investigate complaints of corruption against politicians and bureaucrats without prior government approval.[2][3][4] In April 2011, civil activist Anna Hazare started a Satyagraha movement by commencing an indefinite fast in New Delhi to demand the passing of the bill. The movement attracted attention in the media, and hundreds of thousands of supporters, in part due to the organizational skills of Arvind Kejriwal.[5] Following Hazare's four day hunger strike, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh stated that the bill would be re-introduced in the 2011 monsoon session of the Parliament.[6] Accordingly, a committee of five Cabinet Ministers and five social activists attempted to draft a compromise bill merging the two versions but failed. The Indian government went on to propose its own version in the parliament, which the activists rejected on the grounds of not being sufficiently effective, and called it a "toothless bill".[7] Contents  [hide]  * 1 Background * 2 Key features of proposed bill * 3 Difference between governments and activist drafts * 3.1 Highlights * 3.2 Details * 4 Timeline of Lokpal and cost * 5 Campaign for the Jan Lokpal Bill * 5.1 Fast & Agitation – Phase 1 * 5.2 Drafting Committee * 5.3 Fast & Agitation – Phase 2 * 5.4 Notable supporters and opposition * 6 Criticisms of the Jan Lokpal Bill * 6.1 Naïve approach * 6.2 Extra-constitutional * 6.3 Scope * 6.4 Criticism from Aruna Roy, Arundhati Roy and NCPRI * 7 Support for the Bill * 7.1 Surveys * 7.2 Legislator support * 7.3 Social media * 7.4 Online surveys * 8 Parliamentary actions on the proposed legislation * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 External links| -------------------------------------------------

The word Lokpal was coined in 1963 by L.M.Singhvi, a Member of Parliament during a debate in Parliament about grievance redressal mechanisms. His son Dr. Abhishek Singhvi is now the head of the Parliamentary Standing Committee reviewing the bill.[8] The prefix Jan (translation: citizens) was added to signify the fact that these improvements include input provided by "ordinary citizens" through an activist-driven, non-governmental public consultation.[9][10] The Lokpal bill was first introduced by Shanti Bhushan in 1968[11] and passed the 4th Lok Sabha in 1969. But before it could be passed by Rajya Sabha, Lok Sabha was dissolved and the bill lapsed.[12] The Subsequent versions were re-introduced in 1971, 1977, 1985, 1989, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2005 and in 2008,[13] but none of them passed. The bill was inspired by the Hong KongIndependent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC).[14][15] -------------------------------------------------

[edit]Key features of proposed bill
Some important features of the proposed bill are:[9]
1. To establish a central government anti-corruption institution called Lokpal, supported by Lokayukta at the state level. 2. As in the case of the Supreme Court and Cabinet Secretariat, the Lokpal will be supervised by the Cabinet Secretary and the Election Commission. As a result, it will be completely independent of the government and free from ministerial influence in its investigations. 3. Members will be appointed by judges, Indian...
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