Intro - Impact of Sns

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Km.54, Makiling, Calamba City, Laguna

The Impact of Social Networking Sites to the Academic Performance of the Students of College of Computer Studies in Lyceum of the Philippines – Laguna

Presented To:

Mr. Jonathan Roque

Faculty of

College of Arts and Sciences

In Partial Fulfillment

of the Requirements for the Subject

Communication Arts II (ENGN02A)

Presented by:

Averion, Mary Elaine M.

Abad, Joan Z.

Judalena, Kevin John M

(IT 2-2)





The emergence of new technologies and the fast-paced technological advancements marked the beginning of the 21st century. Different gadgets and tools to suffice the wants and to help ease the difficulties encountered by man in his daily existence have been invented and are constantly developed. Unlike in the past, these changes are not confined to a certain nation or country only, but rather, to the whole human population. Effects of these technologies in the fields of medicine, education, transportation, communication, economics, and warfare, to name a few, are globally observable. Information superhighway is undoubtedly one of the most developed fields. Extensive researches have been done to improve this indispensable field.

The development of what was known to mankind today as Internet is one of the most successful attempts to improve the communication framework. The history of Internet could be traced back to 1960’s. Before the Internet was created, the U.S. military had developed and deployed communications networks, including a network known as ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network). Uses of the networks were restricted to military personnel and the researchers who developed the technology. Many people regard the ARPANET as the precursor of the Internet (Microsoft Encarta 2008).

From the 1970s until the late 1980s the Internet was a U.S. government-funded communication and research tool restricted almost exclusively to academic and military uses. By 1995, the Internet was privatized and commercial use was permitted. This move coincided with the growth in popularity of the World Wide Web (WWW), which was developed by British physicist and computer scientist Timothy Berners-Lee. The Web replaced file transfer as the application used for most Internet traffic. The Internet is the highway system over which Web traffic and traffic from other applications move. The Web consists of programs running on many computers that allow a user to find and display multimedia documents Many analysts attribute the explosion in use and popularity of the Internet to the visual nature of Web documents. By the end of 2000, Web traffic dominated the Internet—more than 80 percent of all traffic on the Internet came from the Web (Microsoft Encarta 2008).

Locke, C, Searls,D., and Weinberge, D. (2000) described Internet as primarily a place in which all participants are audience to each other and entertainment is not packaged. Rather, it is natural. Unlike the lockstep conformity imposed by television, advertising, and corporate propaganda, Internet has given new authority and free rein to play. Many of those drawn into this world find themselves exploring a freedom never before imagined: to indulge their curiosity, to debate, to disagree, to laugh at themselves, to compare visions, to learn, to create new art, new knowledge.

As the statement “No man is an island” implies, people are social beings by nature. We cannot isolate ourselves from the rest of the world. We constantly seek for a means to communicate with what surrounds us, most especially our fellow human beings. Through the endless possibilities of the evolving information superhighway, we find ourselves enmesh in the web of modernization. People find ways to utilize the available resources, and to develop it further to meet the need...
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