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ry Janua

2012

Fast Food Restaurant Report
Nicky Bassford, MPP Lark Galloway-Gilliam, MPA Gwendolyn Flynn Breanna Nicole Morrison, MPL

Promoting Healthy Dining in South Los Angeles

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Our thanks to the many organizations and individuals who contributed to this project. Their cumulative efforts made this publication possible.

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health Paul Simon, MD Jean Tremaine

Principal Authors: Lisa Nicky Bassford, MPP Policy Analyst , Lark Galloway-Gilliam, MPA, Executive Director Gwendolyn Flynn, Policy Director Breanna Nicole Morrison, MPL Design: Aaron Makela, Print Media Collective aaron@printmediacollective.com www.printmediacollective.com Editor:

Public Health Law and Policy Manel Kappagoda, JD, MPH Amy Ackerman, JD Karen Kramer, JD Heather Wooten, MCP Samantha Graff, JD Mabel Everette, RD

Janice Taylor, Communications Director

Community Health Councils is a non-profit, community-based health advocacy, policy and educational organization. Established in 1992, our mission is to improve health and increase access to quality healthcare for uninsured, under-resourced and underserved populations. This policy report is the second in a series of three on how policymakers, private industry and community members can change the South LA food resource environment by increasing access to healthy food outlets and preventing the proliferation of unhealthy food outlets. The first report in this series, Food Desert to Food Oasis: Promoting Grocery Store Development in South Los Angeles, focused on food purchased for the home and proposed policy recommendations to overcome barriers and encourage the establishment of new full-service grocery stores, healthy corner stores, farmers’ markets and mobile produce vendors. The final report will address the roles community members can play in advocating for policy changes, researching the needs and strengths of their neighborhoods, and marketing their neighborhoods to potential healthy food retailers and developers. This publication is part of the REACH US project supported with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. © Community Health Councils, 2011

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Community Health Councils 3731 Stocker Street, Suite 201 Los Angeles, CA 90008 Tel.: 323.295.9372 e-mail: info@chc-inc.org www.chc-inc.org

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Executive Summary Background South Los Angeles Restaurant Environment Fast Food and Health Manufacturing Fast Food Demand Regulating Fast Food Restaurant Development South LA Solution Sit-Down Restaurant Incentives Implementation & Monitoring Compliance Preventing Unintended Consequences Conclusion Appendices South LA Fast Food Restaurant Maps Watsonville Healthy Eating Ordinance Points System and National Fruit & Vegetable Program Potential Constitutional Challenges Land Use Planning Tools Encouraging Restaurants to Offer Healthy Meals

2 4 7 10 13 16 20 25 27 29 30 31

Endnotes

39

Fast Food Restaurant Report

Promoting Healthy Dining in South Los Angeles

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
South Los Angeles is saturated with fast food restaurants that typically serve “unhealthy foods” — foods high in fat, sodium or sugar with few essential nutrients. Eating fast food has been associated with weight gain and lower intake of fruits, vegetables and other nutrient-rich foods that help prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes. A growing body of evidence indicates a correlation between the proximity and density of fast food restaurants and greater fast food consumption. Americans’ growing dependence on dining out coupled with an abundance of fast food restaurants and lack of healthier alternatives in urban, lower-income and racial and ethnic communities like South Los Angeles...
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