If Poem Analysis

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Irfan Khan 260215802
September 3rd, 2009
Mime 221
If by Robert Kupling Analysis
Robert Kupling addresses the qualities which adhere to manhood in this poem If, wherein he identifies certain specific criteria as metaphors for achieving things desired in life. The poem consists of four verses, each eight lines long. Each specific verse held in it a very different interpretation in responsibility, and each prose deals with a separate yet equally important detail that one would need to encounter. Seeing that Kupling was a writer in the late Nineteenth and Twentieth century, it is likely that the poem was meant to be a general message, in which Kupling cleverly disguises his short mini stories within the poem to convey his true thoughts. An engineer could read the poem and relate it to him or her, as the poem is general and relatively idealistic in the message it sends. However, it remains imperative that one read the poem by verse in order to compare oneself by Robert Kuplings standards. Dedication versus risk is the main topic of the third verse, as when one risks it all, it is necessary to pick up the pieces afterwards. As engineers, this situation is rather unlikely barring some unwise decision. In the current day and age, engineers are a highly sought after position and job security is at a premium. As a result, we’ll assume this verse is gears more towards an Arts student. Finally, in the fourth verse, Kupling ends this godforsaken poem the same way he came in and filled the rest: he demanded that one never stray too far to the dark or light side and be stranded in purgatory. If Kupling was in World War II, he would have been Switzerland. Sadly, an engineer has very little chance if his native country is an Evil Empire, and the engineer will find that the knowledge and skills that took so long to garner are being used for mass destruction and long term environmental damages. Kupling coerces us into realizing that as engineers, we will forever be...
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