Ides of March Movie Review

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Like a good politician, The Ides of March promises more than it delivers. A moody political thriller bursting with good intentions, the film veers uneasily between accomplished and trite. Canny packaging and a strong leading cast may help compensate a bit for inevitable bad word-of-mouth. Based on the play Farragut North, the film focuses on press secretary Stephen Meyers (Ryan Gosling), a true believer in Presidential candidate Mike Morris (George Clooney). As Morris, an ideal liberal who is confident and articulate, works his way through the Midwest, Stephen is approached by Tom Duffy (Paul Giamatti), campaign manager for a rival candidate. Their ostensibly secret meeting sets into play twists and reversals that involve Morris, his campaign manager Paul Zara (Philip Seymour Hoffman), and observers like New York Times reporter Ida Horowicz (Marisa Tomei). A second subplot pairs Steve with Molly Stearns (Evan Rachel Wood), an underpaid and possibly underage intern whose political connections will endanger the entire campaign. Lurking in the background: Senator Thompson (Jeffrey Wright), who plays each candidate against the other for a future stake in the White House. As a publicist, I would review that this movie as a political publicity. To me, George Clooney is trying to portray how is the actual political scenario in the States. Ryan Gosling plays the most important role as the publicist for Morris (Clooney), and to me, that is how probably how a publicist work in the political field. Especially with the scene where the rival’s candidate of Morris, Duffy (Paul Giamatti) tried to persuade Meyers to work for them instead of Morris. It is clearly that in the political arena, there might be backstabbing and deception among candidates.
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