Human Rights and Food Security

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A PAPER ON:
‘Human rights and food security’
_______________________________________
PRESENTED BY:
SHASHANKA KUMAR NAG
LL.M- THIRD SEMESTER

HIDAYATULLAH NATIONAL LAW UNIVERSITY
RAIPUR, CHHATTISGARH

Address: Shashanka Kumar Nag
LL.M (Third Semester)
Boys Hostel, B- Block, Room No. F-32
Hidayatullah National law University
Uparwara Post, Abhanpur
New Raipur - 493661 (C.G.)
Mobile: 09804513485, 08817104782
E-mail- shashankanag@gmail.com
DECLARATION
I declare that the work submitted by me for this seminar is a result of my own effort. I affirm that there is no plagiarism and copying, either partially or entirely, from someone else's works, without giving proper credit and acknowledgement to the source(s)/author(s).

INTRODUCTION
“There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.” Mahatma Gandhi

Human rights are commonly understood as "inalienable fundamental rights to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being." Human rights are thus conceived as universal (applicable everywhere) and egalitarian (the same for everyone). These rights may exist as natural rights or as legal rights, in both national and international law. The doctrine of human rights in international practice, within international law, global and regional institutions, in the policies of states and in the activities of non-governmental organizations, has been a cornerstone of public policy around the world. Many of the basic ideas that animated the human rights movement developed in the aftermath of the Second World War and the atrocities of The Holocaust, culminating in the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Paris by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948. The ancient world did not possess the concept of universal human rights. Ancient societies had "elaborate systems of duties... conceptions of justice, political legitimacy, and human flourishing that sought to realize human dignity, flourishing, or well-being entirely independent of human rights". The modern concept of human rights developed during the early Modern period, alongside the European secularization of Judeo-Christian ethics. The true forerunner of human rights discourse was the concept of natural rights which appeared as part of the medieval Natural law tradition that became prominent during the Enlightenment with such philosophers as John Locke, Francis Hutcheson, and Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, and featured prominently in the political discourse of the American Revolution and the French Revolution. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948, partly in response to the atrocities of World War II. Although the UDHR was a non-binding resolution, it is now considered by some to have acquired the force of international customary law which may be invoked in appropriate circumstances by national and other judiciaries. The UDHR urges member nations to promote a number of human, civil, economic and social rights, asserting these rights as part of the "foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world." The declaration was the first international legal effort to limit the behaviour of states and press upon them duties to their citizens following the model of the rights-duty duality. The right to food, and its variations, is a human right protecting the right for people to feed themselves in dignity, implying that sufficient food is available, that people have the means to access it, and that it adequately meets the individual's dietary needs. The right to food protects the right of all human beings to be free from hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition. The right to food does not imply that governments have an obligation to hand out free food to everyone who...
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