How to Write Reference

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Useful links for Harvard Style Referencing
University of Queensland Accessed 15 July, 2012
http://www.library.uq.edu.au/training/citation/harvard_6.pdf Monash University Accessed 15 July, 2012
http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/tutorials/citing/harvard.html University of Western Sydney Accessed 15 July, 2012
http://library.uws.edu.au/FILES/cite_Harvard.pdf Accessed 15 July, 2012 CME Student Guide – Harvard Referencing System Accessed 15 July, 2012 http://www.accg.mq.edu.au/Accg_docs/pdf/postgraduate_coursework/Harvard_Referencing_Syste m.pdf

Harvard Style Reference Generator
Referencing a Website or Electronic Report
Other Reference Types: Full Book | Book Chapter | Journal Article | An E-mail Please fill out ALL the details below, then click the button to generate your reference in the correct format. 窗体顶端
Author:
e.g. Smith, A
Article Title:
Name of Website:
Year of Publication:
Full URL:
e.g. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/99_43_33.htm
Date You Last Visited:
e.g. 20th Aug 2010

窗体底端

About This Tool
If you're a student and have ever had to write Reports, Essays or Theses, you will have had to reference what you have used in your report. If you mention something that someone else has written, you need to give them credit. The Harvard Referencing System is one of the preferred layouts for these references. It is a relatively strict way of arranging the bibliographical information. This tool takes in the raw information - author, title, year of publication - and creates the reference in the correct form. You can then highlight and copy this into the bibliography section of your report. You then reference this next to the relevant section within your essay in the format (Author, Year) such as (Smith, 2005). e.g. The arms race between Bees and Wasps has escalated in recent decades, and many now suggest a full-scale war is inevitable (Benson, 2003). Why have a Bibliography in an Essay or Report?

A Bibliography is a list of the books (or other sources of information) that you consulted when writing an essay, report, thesis or dissertation. When doing research, we very rarely come up with our own theories. These take time to develop, and involve putting them out for debate. By researching the theories of others, we include ideas in our works that have already gone through that academic testing. However, you have to be aware that you are using someone else's work for your own benefit. You will get the marks, but the author of the ideas may have put in decades of research to come up with the concepts. Therefore, you need to ensure that you reference your sources - essentially giving credit to the person whom you are citing. [Read More...]

Referencing using the author-date (Harvard) style
About this resource
The author-date (Harvard) style
Part 1: In-text citations
Part 2: Collating a reference list
A sample reference list in author-date (Harvard) style
Further reading
Printable copy of this resource (82 KB)
About this resource
This resource explains some of the more common applications of the author-date (Harvard) style of referencing. It is based on the Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, 2002, pp. 188–208 and pp. 218–32. You should always check your unit guide and/or with academic staff (unit chair, lecturer or tutor) to make sure that this is the recommended style for your unit. Note that some units, courses and disciplines use variations of the style described here. You must reference all material you use from all sources and acknowledge your sources in the body of your paper each time you use a fact, a conclusion, an idea or a finding from someone's work. This establishes the authority of your work and acknowledges the researchers and writers you have drawn upon in your paper. It is necessary to cite your sources each time you:

reproduce an author's exact words (quote), that is, copy word for word directly from a text. Page numbers must be included in the...
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