How to Remove Heavy Metals

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  • Topic: Mercury, Lead, Mercury poisoning
  • Pages : 11 (3641 words )
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  • Published : January 26, 2013
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How to Remove Heavy Metal Toxins
with Oral Chelation
Do you currently have heavy metal toxins damaging the inside of your body? The answer is unfortunately "yes" for over 99% of us!

So what is a “heavy metal” and what do I need to know? If you’re thinking of Ozzy Osbourne, KISS, or Ted Nugent, you’re not alone. The truth is that most people do not fully understand the real dangers of heavy metal poisons and just how common they are in our modern world. Fortunately, you can take steps to understand and minimize such threats through simple acts of education, prevention, and treatment that will help to lessen any negative impact on you and your family’s health. Remember chemistry class? Heavy metals are simply a certain class of metallic elements. Our bodies require trace amounts of some heavy metals, including copper, zinc, and others, but even these can be dangerous at high levels. Other heavy metals such as mercury, lead, arsenic, and cadmium have no known benefits, and their accumulation over time can cause serious illness and even premature death. The industrialization of our world has dramatically increased the overall environmental 'load' of heavy metal toxins. Today, heavy metals are abundant in our air, soil, and even drinking water. They are present in virtually every area of modern life from construction materials to cosmetics, medicines, processed foods, fuel, appliances, and even personal care products. It is very difficult for anyone to avoid exposure. However, you can take steps to understand and minimize this threat through acts of prevention and treatment that will help to lessen their negative impact on you and your family’s health. Heavy metal toxins contribute to a variety of adverse health effects. There are over 20 different known heavy metal toxins that can impact human health. Accumulation within the body can lead to a decline in the mental, cognitive, and physical health of the individual. The following paragraphs discuss three of the most common and dangerous heavy metal toxins:

How to Remove Heavy Metal Toxins
Arsenic
The use of this toxic element in numerous industrial processes has resulted in its presence in many biological and ecological systems. Ground, surface, and drinking water are susceptible to arsenic poisoning from the use of arsenic in smelting, refining, galvanizing, and power plants; environmental contaminants like pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, desiccants, wood preservatives, and animal feed additives; and human made hazardous waste sites, chemical wastes, and antibiotics. After the absorption of arsenic compounds, the primary areas of distribution are the liver, kidneys, lung, spleen, aorta, and skin. Arsenic compounds are also readily deposited in the hair and nails. Arsenic is a highly toxic element that has been used historically for purposes of suicide and homicide. Its health effects are well known and documented. Acute exposure to arsenic compounds can cause nausea, anorexia, vomiting, abdominal pain, muscle cramps, diarrhea, and burning of the mouth and throat. Garlic-like breath, malaise, and fatigue have also been seen while contact dermatitis, skin lesions, and skin irritation, are seen in individuals who come into direct tactile contact with arsenic compounds. Studies have shown close associations between both inhaled and ingested arsenic and cancer rates. Cancers of the skin, liver, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract are well documented in regards to arsenic exposure. Several arsenic compounds have been classified by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a Class A - Human Carcinogen (IARC 1987). 

How to Remove Heavy Metal Toxins
Lead 
Lead is the 5th most utilized metal in the U.S. Human exposure to lead occurs primarily through drinking water, airborne lead-containing particulates, and lead-based paints. The primary source of lead in drinking water is from lead-based plumbing materials. The corrosion of such materials will...
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