How to Live Longer

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 160
  • Published : April 3, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

Report Information from ProQuest
2013 March 28 06:31 _______________________________________________________________

28 March 2013

ProQuest

1. How to live to 100 ...and enjoy it................................................................................................................... 1

28 March 2013

ii

ProQuest

1 1

How to live to 100 ...and enjoy it
: Anonymous. : New Scientist 190. 2554 (Jun 3-Jun 9, 2006): 35-45. ProQuest : Perhaps people think they stand no chance of clocking up a century, and longevity depends in large part on having the right genes, and one glance at the family tree may reveal that they just won't pass muster. But the way people live is stretching their lifespan. Here, Phillips discusses ways on how to live a longer life and enjoy it. : full text and related services : Perhaps you think you stand no chance of clocking up a century. You know that longevity depends in large part on having the right genes, and one glance at the family tree may reveal that yours just won't pass muster. If so, think on this: centenarians are the fastest-growing demographic group across much of the developed world. Assuming there hasn't been a miraculous Methuselah mutation in the human genome in the past hundred-odd years, we can draw only one conclusion: the way we live is stretching our lifespans. So, what are the secrets of a long and happy life? New Scientist plunders the emerging science of longevity to find out how you can maximise your tally at the final checkout, without compromising any urges you might have to dance in the aisles on the way there 1 GO for the burn How's this for an elixir of youth: an X-ray, a mild case of sunburn, a couple of beers and a sauna. If you think all that would leave you feeling anything but youthful, think again. Many researchers believe that small doses of "stressors" such as poisons, radiation and heat can actually be good for you - so good that they can even reverse the ageing process. This counterintuitive effect, called "hormesis", was once considered flaky, but in recent years it has been shown to extend longevity in yeast, fruit flies, protozoans, worms and rodents. If the findings extend to people, it could stretch the average healthy human lifespan to 90, says biologist Joan Smith-Sonneborn of the University of Wyoming in Laramie. How so? Stressors seem to kick-start natural repair mechanisms, including heat-shock proteins and DNA-repair enzymes, to fix the damage they have caused. If this damage is not too severe, the repair systems may overcompensate, building up enough oomph to repair unrelated damage as well. And if you accept the idea that damage equals ageing, this is nothing less than rejuvenation. There is already some indirect evidence that hormesis has positive effects on human longevity. Between 1980 and 1988, researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, tracked 28,000 nuclear shipyard workers to study the effects of low doses of radiation. To their surprise, they found that the mortality rate of these workers was 24 per cent lower than in a control group of 32,500 shipyard workers of similar ages who were not exposed to radiation. An earlier study by legendary epidemiologist Richard Doll found similar low death rates among radiologists, compared with other doctors. Perhaps most strikingly, Barbara Gilchrest of Boston University has shown that feeding fragments of DNA to elderly human cells grown in culture, which mimics the effect of DNA damage, restores their DNA repair capabilities to levels usually seen only in youthful cells. You may not even have to expose yourself to poisonous chemicals or radiation to see the benefits of hormesis. An increasing number of gerontologists think caloric restriction - the near-starvation diet that is the only reliable way so far of increasing...
tracking img