How to Conduct Critical Writing

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Read the article on the following pages to learn how to write a critique. Then read David Rothenberg’s article, “How the Web Destroys the Quality of Students’ Research Papers” (attached) and write a critique of this article. In your writing, you should pay attention to the following:

1. On a separate page: title, thesis statement and outline
2. The title: Is your title informative enough? (Announce the topic clearly, accurately and briefly. Try not to use figurative language.) 3. Introduction: Have you define the subject of your critique and your point of view in the introduction and underlined your thesis statement? 4. Content:

a) Have you identified and explained the author's ideas, including specific passages that support your description of the author's point of view? b) Have you offered your own opinion, explaining what you think about the author’s argument and describing several points with which you agree or disagree? 5. Conclusion: Have you “restate the thesis and reach beyond it” in your conclusion? 6. Documentation: Have you used appropriate forms when you quote, paraphrase or summarize the source material? Have you provided appropriate citation notes and a list of “Works Cited”? (If you cited only one work, it should be “Work Cited”.)

Grading

1. The title GOOD FAIR WEAK
2. Thesis statement GOOD FAIR WEAK
3. Outline GOOD FAIR WEAK
4. Introduction GOOD FAIR WEAK
5. Content
a) GOOD FAIR WEAK
b) GOOD FAIR WEAK
6. Conclusion GOOD FAIR WEAK
7. Documentation GOOD FAIR WEAK

Writing Critiques

Learning to write a critique is an important step in leaning to analyze critical opinions of the literary work you study.

When college professors ask you to write a critique of a text, they usually expect you to analyze and evaluate, not just summarize. A summary merely reports what the text said; that is, it...
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