How Parents Fear of Play Affects Development

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Assignment title:
Trial and evaluate one research method. Choose and pilot one method on someone you know. Reflect on the experience paying particular attention to how you addressed ethical issues, difficulties encountered, and what you might do differently next time.

Assignment Title: How parent’s fear of play affects children’s cognitive development and how they play Aims:
The aims of this pilot study are to;
Question if fear affects the different ways children play, process and obtain information within cognitive development. •See if parents fear can transmit onto the children
Find out the difference between two children whose parents have opposite ideas of play •Overall aim is to look at how children play and to see if fear affects how children play and process information in regards to playing for obtaining information about the Improvement the general understanding for the importance of fear within cognitive development

Background
Within this research study the researcher will look into the amount of fear a parent has of their child playing, and if it determines how much outdoor play a child has by observing children whose parents are fearful of play and those who aren’t, playing both individually and together in a group. Therefore, firstly, a good beginning to this research project is asking what do we mean by play? “All the things that children do purely for the joy of it are quite rightly called play” (Stallibrass 1974:12). Also Frost, J (2010) explains Plato believed natural play meant you would be a well-developed person, this includes tripping and falling off bicycles. Kimrbo states “The fear of children playing outside is not completely rational” as play is an important part for children to develop as a person and to develop cognitive and social skills. There have been many studies of risk play, however not many have been developed into deeply exploring if parents fear of play can impact how the child will play. Play is an essential and natural part of a child’s life; Children naturally seek and conduct exciting forms of play that involve a risk of physical injury Sandseter, E. (2009:92). Sandseters study suggested that risky playing should be recognised as a significant fragment when children play, and that children should be able to participate in stimulating play adjusted to their specific sense of risk, rather than parent’s sense of risk - but is this the case?

Research design
This research study will explore parental attitudes to play and risk while exploring if children change their attitudes towards play because of their parents fear. I will have a sample group of 2 children and 2 adults, I will observe each child playing individually with parents beside them and then the children playing together without parents (with parental permission) seeing if there is any change in which the children play. Observation methods will be used to offer an chance to authenticate what actually happens regarding parents fear of play rather than what people report, allowing the researcher to record genuine behaviour (O’ Leary, 2009). Therefore a phenomenological observation will occur to address the aims of this research project looking at the events and behaviours of children while they play. The observation will last 1 hour long and I will ensure I observe the children 3 times to guarantee a fair observation also certifying each respondent taking part in this study must be fully informed of what the project entails. Each child must be at the same school within the same year group so they are comfortable playing with each other. Further, the observation will take place ethnographically, Silverman, D. (1997), in naturalistic setting, a playground which is local to both sets of children where they have both played before. There is more information about the observation on the observation sheet the researcher filled out while observing so the observations were recorded (see appendix)....
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