How Lack of Sleep Affects Students

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On February 2013, a survey was given out to the Social Work 411 class. The purpose of the survey was to determine how the lack of sleep affects a student’s academic performance. A series of questions were asked to determine the average amounts of sleep students get on a weekly bases, and if they encountered any difficulties sleeping. A total of 26 surveys were handed 25 were completed during this study. Of the individuals surveyed, 96 percent of participants are female, and (4) percent were male. The majority of the participants were between ages 18-24 (88 percent). Nearly 72 percent of the participants are single. The participants were asked if they had children 68 percent said no. The majority of the participants (88.8 percent) identify themselves as Latina/Latino, followed by 4.0 percent Caucasian, 4.0 percent checked off other, and 4.0 declined to state. Approximately 92 percent of the students attend full-time, 4 percent part-time, and 4 percent selected other (see table 1).

Ethnicity
FrequencyPercentValid PercentCumulative Percent
ValidCaucasian14.04.04.0
Latino/Latina2288.088.092.0
Other14.04.096.0
Declined to state14.04.0100.0
Total25100.0100.0
Table 1

Participants were asked about their current employment status. Of the individuals surveyed, the majority were part-time (40 percent), 16 percent were full-time, 16 percent are enrolled in an internship program, and 28 percent were seasonally employed.

Of the participants who were surveyed, 100 percent stated that they were not taking any type of medication that affected their ability to sleep. Of those, the majority (88 percent) did not have insomnia and 12 percent did. Approximately, (88 percent) did not take naps in between classes while 12 percent did. The majority of the participants, stated feeling sleepy in class (56 percent), while 44 percent did not. Participants stated that having caffeine affected their ability to sleep (32 percent)...
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