How Does Technology Negatively Affect Daily Lives?

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How Does Technology Negatively Affect Daily Lives?
The other night I had a terrible nightmare. My friend and I ignored each other when we were having lunch because we were both busy texting somebody else. I barely remembered our conversation because it was fragmented. After that, I logged on Facebook, on which I had already spent all my spare time, trying to catch up with my 1000+ “friends”. Unfortunately, I found most of them I barely know or see. Oh wait, it’s not a dream. It’s happening in reality. With the rapid development of communication technology, new methods of communication, for example cell phones and the Internet, are popularizing in daily lives and are replacing the old way of communication – face-to-face interaction. The use of communication technology has had negative effects on daily lives: it destroys the quality of personal communication, causes social isolation and leads to many addictions.

First, technology destroys the quality of personal communication. People might think that technology, offering various ways of communication, such as cell phones and the Internet, makes verbal interaction simpler and easier. That’s true. We do enjoy the benefits of technology. People move one finger to click the small green button on the cell phone then could speak to others. Text and email are easy as well. However, the convenience does not guarantee the quality of communication but comes with two problems. One significant problem is that the convenience makes multitasking possible, but multitasking means the quality of each communication is destroyed. Like the nightmare I described in the first paragraph, I was supposed to have a good conversation with my friend when we were together, but the conversation that disturbed by texts all the time had an extremely low-quality. It does not only happen between my friends but also happens everywhere. In “Connected, but Alone,” Turkle (2012), a professor of Social Studies of Science and Technology at...
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