History of the Nco Creed

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The Creed has been around in different versions for a number of years. Long into their careers, sergeants commit to memory the reciting the NCO Creed during their. Virtually every NCO’s office or home has a copy hanging on a wall. Some have intricate etchings in metal on a wooden plaque, or printed in fine writing. But a quick glance at any copy of the NCO Creed and you will see no author's name at the bottom. Why is this? The origin of the NCO Creed is a story of its own. In 1973, the Army (and the noncommissioned officer corps) was in disorder. Of the Post-Vietnam developments in American military policy, the most influential in determining the Army was the advent of the Modern Volunteer Army. With the beginning of the Noncommissioned Officer Candidate Course, countless young sergeants were not the skilled trainers of the past and were only trained to perform a specific job; squad leaders in Vietnam. The noncommissioned officer system was under development and the army was rewriting its Field Manual 22-100, Leadership, to set a guide for leaders to follow. Of those working on the challenges at hand, one of the only NCO-pure instructional departments at the U.S Army Infantry School (USAIS) at Fort Benning, Georgia, GA was the NCO Subcommittee of the Command and Leadership Committee in the Leadership Department. Besides training soldiers at the Noncommissioned Officers Academy, these NCOs also developed instructional material and worked as part of the team developing model leadership programs of instruction.
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