Hiring for Smarts

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Running head: HIRING FOR SMARTS

Hiring For Smarts
By Justin Menkes
Harvard Business Review
Justin Menkes (2005) wrote a thought provoking article in the Harvard Business Review exploring how an I.Q. test can predict the "Star" employees within a company. In the November 2005 article, Menkes (2005) further investigate how charisma, compassion, and social awareness can take an employee only so far. The ability to intellectually think a problem through and reach not only the conclusion, but also any unforeseen outcomes is a gift that creates the truly stellar business person. Likewise, there are certain key abilities that can propel an employee into the forefront of the company's eye, allowing them to be targeted for managerial positions.

The most important ability a business leader must have is the critical thinking skill. This paper will discuss the three subjects that managerial work falls into in regards to critical thinking: accomplishing tasks, working with and through others, and judging oneself and adapting one's behavior accordingly (2005, pg. 102).

Menkes states that, "…intelligent executives make decisions using a set of six core cognitive skills. Among them are critically examining underlying assumptions and identifying probable unintended consequences" (2005, pg. 102). Being able to not only think through evident problems unto completion, but also to predict any unforeseen problems and find resolutions is the base of critical thinking.

A great leader can mold themselves to the culture and atmosphere of a team. They can work well with others and still they can delegate tasks rather than feel they need to finish them on their own. Being able to work through others is just as important as working with them. An exceptional employee has the ability to balance both of these skills. Menkes continues with the suggestion that, "recognizing the underlying agendas of others and considering the probable effects of one's actions" fits directly...
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