Heat Detector

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A heat detector is a fire alarm device designed to respond when the convected thermal energy of a fire increases the temperature of a heat sensitive element. The thermal mass and conductivity of the element regulate the rate flow of heat into the element. All heat detectors have this thermal lag. Heat detectors have two main classifications of operation, "rate-of-rise" and "fixed temperature."

|Contents | | | |1 Fixed temperature heat detectors | |2 Rate-of-rise heat detectors | |3 Heat detector selection | |4 See also |

[ Fixed temperature heat detectors

This is the most common type of heat detector. Fixed temperature detectors operate when the heat sensitive eutectic alloy reaches the eutectic point changing state from a solid to a liquid. Thermal lag delays the accumulation of heat at the sensitive element so that a fixed-temperature device will reach its operating temperature sometime after the surrounding air temperature exceeds that temperature. The most common fixed temperature point for electrically connected heat detectors is 136.4°F (58°C). Technological developments have enabled the perfection of detectors that activate at a temperature of 117°F (47°C), increasing the available reaction time and margin of safety. This type of technology has been available for decades without the use of batteries or electricity as shown in the picture.

Rate-of-rise heat detectors

Rate-of-Rise (ROR) heat detectors operate on a rapid rise in element temperature of 12° to 15°F (6.7° to 8.3°C) increase per minute, irrespective of the starting temperature. This type of heat detector can operate at a lower temperature fire condition than would be possible if the threshold were fixed. Rate of rise detectors...
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