Grecian Couch

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  • Topic: Couch, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, Chair
  • Pages : 4 (1633 words )
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  • Published : April 21, 2012
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Grecian Couch
The Grecian couch, otherwise known as a Kline in Greece, is a blending of a bed, couch, and sofa. Its functions is not only limited to providing a seat for sleeping and reposing, but also for reclining in when eating food. The long frame of the couch provides just the right length for a petite lady to repose in. Also the top of the frame is usually fixed with interlaced cords and on the interlacing; a mattress is placed on top of it with covers and a single long pillow. The mattress, covers, and pillows are richly embroidered with silk in a light gold color. The form directs the sitter to lie usually in any position leaving the head to rest on the right where the tallest backing is. There is only one armrest on the very left of the couch and a waist length backing to hold the sitter from falling off. While other Grecian Couches were being supplemented by rosewood, it is principally made out of mahogany wood. The legs “that was similar to those found on a throne chair, namely legs terminating in animals’ feet” (Boger, “Guide to Furniture Styles” 5), are usually in the form of chimera, lion, eagles, and swans. The carvings are earthy with leaf patterns and extended curved lines following the over arching “sweeping curves and scrolls” (Boger, “Guide to Furniture Styles” 5) that resembles the work of Duncan Phyfe in America. They are realistically carved sometimes with “medley of and human heads, sphinxes with upraised wings, dolphins, swans, ringed lion’s mask, and the lion monopodium (Boger, “Furniture Past & Present” 364). Today, the additions of wheels are sometimes added to the legs of the couch to give it mobility. The John and Hugh Finlay brothers were the designers responsible for creating the couch, and much more famous Grecian furniture. The Finlay brothers first advertised their designs in the Baltimore Federal Gazette of January 25, 1803. It was not until 1810 (Henry Ford Museum) till the Hugh brothers crafted the Grecian chair. The...
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