Good and Evil

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Good and Evil
My report examines the connection of the coexistence of good and evil across texts and how these aspects effect human nature and society. The texts I used were ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee, ‘The Help’ by Tate Taylor, ‘Noughts & Crosses’ by Malorie Blackman and ‘Harawira drops N-bomb in water hui debate” by Danya Levy. I believe these texts explore the moral nature of society and human beings as essentially being good and evil through social drifts of racial prejudice, discrimination and illustrates the effect of these on human nature and society through the characters responses to these societal niches. The primary form of evil across the texts is the social drifts that exist in the texts such as racial prejudice and discrimination. These are prevalent dilemmas in all texts. If we take for instances in “To Kill a Mockingbird” prejudice is often committed against the Negroes of the community of Maycomb by the whites. The community often regards Negroes as liars and criminals simply because they are black. “You gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption- the evil assumption that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral beings…” Without actually considering the black peoples perspective the community immediately gain the preconception that this is how the blacks are. This is the whole nature and attitude of most of the people in Maycomb( where TKMB is set) throughout the story. Likewise with ‘Noughts & Crosses’ the Crosses believe that Noughts are inferior to them in every way and are nothing but trouble. Crosses put forward these prejudice ideas about Noughts in order to keep the two races from living alongside each other as both races despise each other and keeping themselves in power with no influence of Noughts running the country. The article ‘Harawira drops N-bomb in water hui debate” is slightly different in a way as it deals more with discrimination against Maori but nevertheless discrimination has the same effect of injustice towards a race or class as prejudice. In this article it is suggested by Hone that Maori are under the harsh dictatorship of John Key and have no control over their actions. “Maybe they should go back to John Key and tell him to stop treating his Maori MPs like he’s a plantation owner from Alabama in the 1950’s.” Hone throughout the article points out that John Key is not being lenient on his Maori MP’s on attending a debate about ‘Water Rights’ concerning the Maori, Hone expresses the fact that John Key should leave it up to the Maori MPs to decide what they want to do rather than follow orders by John Key like “little house niggers.” “The Help” tackles discrimination quite differently. Not only are the black maids in “The Help” treated unfavorably on the basis of their skin but “Miss Hilly” who is regarded as the main antagonist of the film is wrapped up in this idea that blacks carry a harmful disease that threatens the community of Jackson, Mississippi(Where The Help is set). The discrimination in “The Help” is the obvious white and black scene but the fact that the blacks are also treated unfavorably based on what diseases they carry and made to use separate bathrooms go beyond discrimination. This sort of conduct is how animals are treated because animals are made to stay outside just as blacks are made to use separate bathrooms. The one thing I noticed across these texts is that these social drifts left a certain race or class victimized by the turmoil these social drifts inflicted on them. Naturally from this consequence of victimization the audience of these texts is likely to gain a negative impression of prejudice and discrimination and make an informed decision that these conducts are “evil” which is exactly the way I regarded these social drifts. What prejudice and discrimination does is it makes somebody to believe that they are less human than everybody else whereas in actual fact we are all equal as anybody is as human as...
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