Globalization Helps Consumerism

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Consumerism Helps Globalization

Consumerism is the fact or practice of an increasing consumption of goods, and when an ever-expanding consumption is advantageous to the economy. Globalization describes the process by which regional economies, societies, and cultures have become integrated through communication, transportation, and trade. Through increasing consumerism globalization has been made possible in Europe. Globalization brought a new era of prosperity in Europe. Increasingly the middle-class would begin consuming overseas goods such as porcelain, tea, coffee, sugar, and other products imported from overseas markets. The consumer revolution would lay the groundwork for a consumer economy and industrialization. By the early seventeenth century ordinary citizens, mainly in urbanized areas, began to be able to acquire consumer goods. This helped make drastic improvements in housing, communication, and even the postal service. Consumerism was also linked with international trade which increased by a third, and was a remarkable period of trade expansion in history. In the late seventeenth century people began drinking tea, coffee, and chocolate from china (porcelain) cups and most social gatherings were centered around these beverages. In 1675 nine percent of English families had pewter plates, and even though they were going out of style in 1725 forty-five percent of English families now owned them. By the end of 1725 cups, plates, and utensils for these beverages could be found in fifteen percent of European homes. During the Tang Dynasty the Chinese were said to have made the first true porcelain. Through trade and communication this spread to Korea in the 1100’s, to Japan in the 1300’s, and to Europe in the early 1600’s. Coffee primarily cultivated in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Africa, but through trade the Europeans got their hands on this very popular drink. In 1647 the first coffee house was opened in St. Mark’s Square, Venice. The first...
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