Gender Differences in Parental Influence on Adolescent Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating a Review of the Literature

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Running head: BODY DISSATISFACTION AND DISORDERED EATING

Gender Differences in Parental Influence on Adolescent Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating a Review of the Literature

The journal article being reviewed, ‘Gender differences in parental influences on adolescent body dissastisfaction and disordered eating’ is a research that was carried out by Rachel Rodgers, Karine Faure, and Henri Chabrol (2009). Rodgers is

The purpose of this paper is to review the journal article ‘Gender differences in parental influences on adolescent body dissatisfaction and disordered eating.’ The researchers looked at body dissatisfaction and disordered eating in adolescents and how it results from their parents’ influence, attitudes, and behavior. The article examines if it differs between genders.

I found the article being reviewed to be well written, to be grammatically correct, concise and the authors avoided to use of jargons. The layout of the report was organized which allowed an ease of reading and understanding. The qualifications and positions of the researchers give an indication that they are experienced and knowledgeable in their field of study. The topic of the article was clearly defined but was not specific to what the researchers intended to investigate. The researchers looked at the adolescent perception of how they are influenced by their parents in their dissatisfaction of the body and disordered eating. The topic did not state this. The topic however, identified the intended audience of the research; adolescents. I found the article’s abstract to give a give a clear overview of the research that was carried. It entailed the research problem, sample, methodology, and finding. A recommendation was however not included in the abstract. All the key words were identified in the articles’ abstract; however no conceptual definitions were given.

The objective of the research was to expand the understanding of gender differences in the perception of parental body and eating related attitudes, behaviors and messages, and how they influence body dissatisfaction and disordered eating in their children (Rodgers, et al, 2009). From this, the researchers hypothesized that boys would have a lower level of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating and perceive less parental body and eating-related comments, pressure and modeling than girls. Rodger et al (2009) also looked at the variance between body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviors that resulted from parental influence. Using this objective they hypothesized that the variance found would be greater among the adolescent girls than the boys.

The research questions used by the authors in the article are linked to each hypothesis. Both are used as a guide to the exploration of the study. In regards to the first hypothesis, the independent variable was parental influence: which is the presumed cause, and a dependent variable was body dissatisfaction and disordered eating: the presumed effect or response that was measured, were easily identifiable. The relationship between the two variables was a positive correlation. The second hypothesis’ independent variable is the parents’ body and eating comments, pressures and parent modeling. The dependent variable is the adolescents’ body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. Hypothesis one in the research was a research statement and the second hypothesis a null statement. Both hypothesize have a positive correlation and are testable.

Numerous studies were cites in relation to and support of the study. Existing data identifies parents as important transmitters of attitudes and behaviors (Cassuto, 2005). Some authors have reported evidence in line with the focus on female appearance girls perceiving pressure to be thin from their family (Presnel, Bearman, & Stice, 2004), and body related comments (McCabe, & Ricciardelli, 2003). Parental body and eating related criticism has shown an...
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