Flood Impact Assessment

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 146
  • Published : February 13, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Focus on UNDP Interventions in
Ampara, Sri Lanka

OVERVIEW

The second week of January 2011, heavy rains caused extensive flooding in most parts of Eastern Province. On 11th & 12th of January & 17th – 19th January, the UNDP-Ampara assessed the district to determine flood impact for livelihood, Infrastructures facilities, human life & impact for its livelihood development interventions.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The 2011 monsoon induced flooding in Ampara constitutes an evolving crisis on an unprecedented scale. The impact of the flood has varied. Flatter areas of Ampara affected by Flash flood & and highly destructive, Riverine flooding has been a very destructive phenomenon, although with a slower onset, affecting densely populated and cultivated areas. In lower Akkarapattu & Kalmunai, the ongoing riverine flooding may have longer lasting effects.

By 19th January 2011 nearly 0.5 million people were directly affected by the flood Reported 11 deaths. Around 1100 houses fully damaged or made unlivable & nearly 4800 houses partially damaged due to flood victims. More than 2700 hectares of standing crops were damaged or lost. More than 60 percent lost immediate access to their primary livelihood and are faced with a drop. Livestock was severely impacted with on average 40% of livestock lost by flood affected households. Also flood causing millions of LKR in looses and damages to infrastructure, housing, agriculture & livestock, and other family assets. Essential infrastructure & irrigation resources including roads, bridges & markets, Irrigation channels & some tanks has been severely damaged & many remains impassable.

This flood impact assessment is based on several just completed rapid surveys from different agencies & TRP rapid assessment findings. This Assessment aims to quantify the extent of damages & impact to TRP project sites & its interventions & other essential infrastructures. Agricultural production was heavily impacted with losses in standing crops, land, livestock and agricultural inputs and assets.

Map-1 provides an overview of the affected areas & accessibility to divisions

THE EXTENT OF DAMAGE

Housing

The District Disaster Management Coordination Unit (DDMCU) & District Secretariat counted 1,148 fully damaged and 4,719 partially damaged houses. The damage was most pronounced in the Sammanthurai Division (Fully Damaged: 401 / Partially Damaged: 1,149).

Infrastructure & Irrigation Channels
Damage to road infrastructure was extensive, cutting off many communities from essential supplies. The damage was greatest in the areas impacted by the flash floods in flatter areas where many bridges, culverts & Irrigation channels collapsed rendering some areas completely inaccessible. The flood caused damage to electricity supply and installations. Power supply was interrupted in some towns. The majorities of ground water wells were clogged up with mud and silt and are unusable.

IMPACT ON AGRICULTURE, CROPS AND LIVESTOCK & SEED PROCESSING CENTERS The monsoon floods caused damages of unprecedented scale to agriculture crops, livestock, fisheries and forestry and have destroyed primary infrastructure such as tube wells, water channels including irrigation channels household storages, houses, animal sheds, personal seed stocks, fertilizers and agricultural machinery. The floods struck just before the harvesting of key crops, including rice, maize, vegetables & Cowpea.

Chart 1 shows the loss of Poultry (Livestock) in division level as a percentage

Chart-2 shows Loss of cattle, Buffaloes & Goats during flood as a number

Chart-3 shows, # of livestock farmers affected in divisional level

[pic]

The principal means of livelihood before the flood for half of the population in flood affected areas was agricultural crop farming (more than 75%). Fifteen percent depended on casual wage labour as their primary source of income. Livestock rearing was the second most common means of livelihood for...
tracking img