Geographic Factors Dbq

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  • Topic: Nile, Desertification, Desert
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DBQ Essay6-5-12
As history repeats itself, we continue to notice that there are many geographic factors that effect regions across the world. A few of the most noticeable are monsoons and deserts. Over time these factors have altered the relationships between certain regions and benefitted our development in society. However, they can be extremely demoralizing as well. Not only is nature disrupted but the way in which people live on a daily basis. We are forced to make changes and adapt to the overwhelming geographic factors.

Monsoons are one uncontrollable geographic factor that plays a huge role on the outcome of the world’s living conditions and adaptations. A monsoon is a seasonal prevailing wind that blows for a whole season in the region of the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. Every summer, southern Asia and India, is drenched by rain that comes from these moist air masses. It is difficult to fully adapt to and understand the works of a monsoon due to its variation of strength and intensity from year to year. On a year with less hydration, crops suffer due to their dependence for a certain amount of water. On a year with more rainfall, crops drown from the flooding results of the monsoon. Crops are not the only aspect being affected by these floods. The other conclusions were shown and written by Priit J. Vesilind in a National Geographic, “Last year [1983] the city lay under water mixed sewage, rotting grain, and floating carcasses of dead animals. Elsewhere in the state flash floods swept away a locomotive and three railcars.” (doc.6a) Destruction and harsh living conditions is what the people of Varanasi faced in 1983. Shown in the photograph by Steve McCurry in the National Geographic, this city is adapting to these circumstances by means of transportation. Limited transportation meant a modification in trade. In the book, The World That Trade Created, M. E. Shapre discusses this problem, “All across maritime Asia—from Canton...
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