Evolution of Architecture

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Gothic architecture, Architectural style, Gothic Revival architecture
  • Pages : 6 (1930 words )
  • Download(s) : 1772
  • Published : May 6, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
The Evolution of Architecture due to several analyzed themes (Gothic architecture and Modern architecture)

Abstract

This paper contains a comparative analysis of the evolution of architecture in relation to Gothic revival and Modern Architecture. In this comparative analysis the similarities and differences of each style are highlighted and discussed. It further discusses and illustrates the elements which are unique to each style. The buildings which are the subject of this analysis includes: St. Patrick’s Roman Cathedral at Jemmotts' Lane in Barbados, St. Agnes Parish Church in the Bahamas (gothic revival) and the Winchester Business Centre on Hope Road, Kingston, Jamaica and Michi Supercenter on Washington Boulevard, Kingston, Jamaica (modern architecture).

Language—a complex term—just like architecture, is difficult to define. However, in some ways, it is not entirely impossible to do so. One can assume that architecture is just a building and identify it as such, but architecture is undoubtedly not just putting up an elaborate or highly decorated building. Rather, it can be considered to be a progression that inspires the intersection between humans and the world, and connects humans to the empty space they live in,( Hooker, 1996).Architecture does this by organizing the empty space, through the use of physical materials. Throughout the ages, architecture has been constantly evolving due to several analyzed themes. These themes include; the materials used, design, style and architectural elements. Through different interpretations of these themes, overtime, architecture has been seen to branch into many different styles. Of these styles, we can reflect on and compare gothic revival and modern to show the evolving nature of architecture through a discussion of architectural themes.

The Gothic style of architecture, with its high rank in ecclesiastical taste, refers to the design of one of the most exalted classes of architecture produced. This style of architecture was quite prevalent during the medieval period. Gothic architecture originated in the 12th century, but with the revival in the mid-18th century, it has travelled with time into today’s modern era. It can be viewed in churches and cathedrals, where the Gothic revival style is fully and most powerfully expressed. St. Patrick’s Roman Cathedral at Jemmotts' Lane in Barbados, and St. Agnes Parish Church in the Bahamas, are two interesting examples, representing the Gothic style. The Gothic revival style of architecture has bled into the modern era which has further changed and evolved this style today. St. Patrick’s Roman Cathedral

St. Patrick’s Roman Cathedral
Essentially gothic revival, St. Patrick’s Roman Cathedral, Barbados was originally built in 1848, but was destroyed by fire in 1897. The rebuilding of the cathedral was completed in 1899 and sanctified on August 23, 1903. In today’s era, the Catholic Church serves as a home to the largest church congregations on the island (Crain, 1994, p.189) St. Agnes Anglican Church

St. Agnes Anglican Church
The St. Agnes Anglican Church located in Grants town, New Provident, The Bahamas, was built in 1868. In September of 1928 an intense hurricane devastated New Providence, leaving the beautiful structure tattered. This resulted in a complete refurbishment of the building, which was completed in May of 1929. According to Crain (1994) “The design of the church is unusual Gothic revival” (Crain, 1994, p.195). Thus, both The St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church and The St. Agnes Anglican Church identify as gothic revival architecture and are very similar in construct, aiming to bring across the era they represent. Stemming from the 18th century, these churches being classic examples of unique architecture, establish their differences from that of the modern era.

Modern architecture—a term which here refers to the indefinite continuous movement of time through the ages—began at the beginning of...
tracking img