Everyman vs. the Pardoner's Tale

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Morality is strongly lacking in present society, as it was lacking in society in medieval times. The play, Everyman, and the short story, The Pardoner's Tale, are both literary works which try to educate the reader in the proper ways of life. Everyman's theme seems to aim toward educating the reader on the reasons why death comes to all people. The Pardoner's Tale obviously preaches against the sin of greed as well as hints at a lesson against pretence.

Everyman is an allegorical play that focuses on death and explains death by using different values and qualities found in a good human being, such as "Good Deeds", "Knowledge", and "Fellowship". According to the play, because the only things that everyman can take along in death is the good deeds and values he has learned during life these things will exist forever.

The Pardoner's Tale educates its readers in morality by preaching against greed and insinuating lessons against hypocrisy. The pardoner is a fake and a greedy lecher who is extremely inappropriate to be giving the sermon. He does not abide by the rules of the clergy yet he is preaching against the sins of greed. While chastising the clergy for their common disrespect for the rules of the church, Chaucer also fits in a lesson against greed in this exemplum.

Each piece reflects lessons on morality and conduct. Everyman teaches common decency and the inevitability of death, while The Pardoner's Tale teaches the evil of greed and dissimulation. These two works are both effective in portraying their lessons and teaching their readers.
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