Everyman and Death: Understanding the Perception and Treatment

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Everyman and Death: Understanding the Perception and Treatment

Jonathan Thomas

Liberty University

Thesis Statement:

In this paper, this writer will evaluate the perception and the treatment of death in

Everyman.

Outline

I. Introduction
II. Purpose of Morality Plays
III. Main Body: Discussion of Plays Characters
a. God
b. Death
c. Everyman
d. Fellowship
e. Kindred & Cousin
f. Goods
g. Good Deeds
h. Knowledge
i. Confession
j. Five Wits
i. Beauty
ii. Strength
iii. Discretion
k. Angel
l. Doctor
IV. Understanding on Christian faith and biblical scripture in comparison V. Conclusion
VI. Reference

Everyman and Death: Understanding the

Perception and Treatment

In life all people must deal with their life and the aspect of death, there is no escape. In Literature, authors often use imagery and experiences in life to help evaluate the human condition and ones’ own experiences in a different manner. The author for Everyman, even though anonymous, has presented an idea of how all individuals must face death and judgment that all will have to face in the presences of God. In this paper, this writer will evaluate the perception and the treatment of death in Everyman, the character usage and the role judgment play in death concluding with the Christian view of death and judgment in comparison. The importance in the play Everyman, understands the significance and purpose of a morality play. A morality play is an allegorical drama popular in Europe especially during the 15th and 16th centuries, in which characters personify moral qualities or abstractions and in which a moral lesson is taught. Morality plays were an intermediate step in the transition from liturgical to professional secular drama, and combine elements of each (morality, 2012). In Everyman, the main question that is being considered is what Everyman must do for salvation and how each will perceive death. According to Garner, morality drama, the neglect of performance has been influenced by two more particular factors: the paucity of evidence concerning how these plays actually were performed, and the misleading choice, since Everyman as the paradigmatic morality (1987). The morality play, in the case of the Everyman, helps the reader understand the what is perceived of the experience of dying and having to go before God a face judgment. In the beginning, God begins by explaining that death will come to Everyman and that following each will face judgment. He is summoning Death to go seek out Everyman to go on a journey that will place him in front of God for judgment. The Death character enters and seeks out Everyman to tell him of the journey that awaits him. Everyman is taken aback, because Death was not an expected guest. Everyman is seen having some internal struggle with the death and judgment of God that he is facing. Everyman tries to ask for more time before having to go before God for judgment or to have another accompany him on his journey. Death will not give him more time, but allows him seek out another to come with him to face judgment. The Everyman begins his journey by seeking out ones to accompany him on his journey to judgment, with the knowledge of not returning. There is a board overview of religious views that Everyman takes in pursuing what he believes will allow him positive judgment from God and not be sent to the depths of hell, but enjoy everlasting life with God. The initial “kinsmen” is Fellowship, which stands to represent that fellowship with other believers will be able to provide him good favor with the Lord. After all he is with other people that believe as he does so, it is only logically that his would please the Lord; however, Fellowship upon finding out the true nature of Everyman’s request immediately denies his assistance to complete his journey. He...
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