Ethic Obligations

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Ethic Obligations
Most workers understand that they must balance their home life and their career. But how they go about doing this is what most struggle with even today. A manager needs to think about their most resourceful asset, their employees. When you are a manager, you have the tough decisions to make in keeping with the company’s goals, but striving to make money for your stockholders as well. This paper will discuss the following two questions. What are the ethical implications of requiring that employees dedicate long hours and extensive travel time to their careers? What obligations, if any, does a manager or employer have to enable employees to create a balanced professional and private life? The ethical dilemma for managers would be to ask themselves: is my decision the one that produces the greatest good for the greatest number of people, using the efficiency and effectiveness measurements. Is it productive to have employees work that many hours? Are they getting the job completed, but is the completed job done correctly? Is this time system appropriate for the company to ask their employees to work, is it actually necessary? Managers need to utilize the decision making rules to make sure that they are being fair, by remaining unbiased and acting appropriately in situations where the company needs to balance their interest with the interest of the employee (George & Jones, 2011). According to the Journal of Managerial Psychology, overworked employees with workloads that are unreasonable can cause undue pressure, impossible deadlines, and unnecessary disruptions in the workplace. This could be construed as workplace bullying or abusive supervision. Because overworked employees are more likely to make mistakes that could potentially be very costly. They could also feel anger or resentment toward their employer or coworkers. This could all lead to those employees looking for work elsewhere (Avery, 2010). There are a lot of decisions that need to be...
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