English Igcse

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Edexcel Certificate Edexcel International GCSE

Centre Number

Candidate Number

English Language A
Paper 1
Friday 25 May 2012 – Afternoon Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
You do not need any other materials.
Paper Reference

KEA0/01 4EA0/01
Total Marks

Instructions
Use black ink or ball-point pen. Fill in the boxes at the top of this page with your name, centre number and candidate number. Answer all questions. Answer the questions in the spaces provided – there may be more space than you need.

Information
The total mark for this paper is 60. The marks for each question are shown in brackets – use this as a guide as to how much time to spend on each question. The quality of written communication will be assessed in your responses to Sections B and C – you should take particular care on these questions with your spelling, punctuation and grammar, as well as the clarity of expression. Copies of the Edexcel Anthology for IGCSE English Language and IGCSE English Literature may not be brought into the examination. Dictionaries may not be used in this examination.

Advice
Read each question carefully before you start to answer it. Keep an eye on the time. Try to answer every question. Check your answers if you have time at the end. Turn over

P40032A
©2012 Pearson Education Ltd.

*P40032A0120*

1/1/1/1/1

Section A: Reading You should spend about 45 minutes on this section. Read the following passage carefully and then answer the questions which follow. As a child the writer lived with his mother, named Jenny, and Alexander his brother, on an isolated hilltop sheep farm. In this passage he describes a dramatic snow storm. Blizzard! Every winter Jenny listened to weather forecasts with dread, equally concerned for us and for the animals. She had developed a winter routine; at the first 5 threatening forecast she stocked up supplies, moved the sheep to fields sheltered from the expected direction of the wind, and waited. We knew she dreaded the snow, but Alexander and I looked forward to it; she was in control, 10 what did we have to fear? One memorable morning the flakes fell, sometimes fast, sometimes slowly, sidelong slipping through colder air, careless, unhurried, as if the weather was shifting from foot to foot, waiting. As Jenny walked back up the hill it began to fall heavily; now there was nothing warm anywhere in the world, except her sheep in their coats. ‘Good girls, sensible sheep, you stay there. You’ll be warm under that hedge …’ That evening Jenny turned away from the radio and towards the supper she was making, frowning. The forecast was not good. We ate, played and built one of our great fires. We filled the grate with branches over crumpled newspaper and twigs, lit it, and basked in the heat of a roaring fire, which sent sparks popping and swirling up the chimney and flung ruddy light into the cold sitting room. We perched as close to it as we could, until our clothes were almost too hot to touch and our clammy backs felt feverish, as though they too were glowing red. The crackling branches spat sparks on to the rug, and we stamped them out, barely noticing the little black holes that remained. When the blaze had burned down to its embers we went to bed and the next day the storm arrived. As Alexander and I retreated to the living room, arming ourselves with toy guns, Jenny set out to feed the sheep. Snow was already drifting in the lanes, forming waves against every wall, hedge and bank. The world was changing shape. The cold soon drained the strength out of Jenny’s arms and legs, but she did what she could, dragging out bales of hay. The wind spun armfuls of hay away into the white, swirling it off like so much dust. She made it as far as the Lower Meadows, ducking lower and lower under the blizzard. Peering about her she realised she was nearly lost, in a field she knew well. She turned back. Icicles were forming in her hair where it...
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