English Correspondence

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2010

Table of Contents
Introduction
Chapter I. Interaction in Writing
§ 1.1 The Language of Correspondence: Epistolary Identity or Overview § 1.2 Letters as a Source for Building Social Networks
§ 1.3 Classification of Written English Correspondence
§ 1.4 Genre and Register of Written Correspondence
Chapter II. Analysis of
§ 1.1
§ 1.2
§ 1.3
§ 1.4
Chapter III.
§ 1.1
§ 1.2
§ 1.3
§ 1.4
Conclusion
Bibliography

Chapter I. Interaction in Writing
§ 1.1 The Language of Correspondence: Epistolary Identity or Overview Today English is the most popular international language in the world. According to the ethnologies, there are over one billion people who speak English as a first or second language, and use English language for business or education. But less than a third of these speak English as their first language because of colonization by the British Empire of North America, India, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand, where English was adopted as their first or second language. So, English is spoken in a big number of countries and territories as United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, The United States of America, Australia, India, Pakistan, Singapore and others, and has a great diversity of dialects, such as Hiberno-English, Indo-Pakistani English, Philippine English and others. This diversity of spoken English and dialects determine the differences in written English by diversity of traditions, practices, and cultures of letter writing and include physical features such as handwriting, abbreviations and spelling conventions. Writing itself is a method of representing language in visual or tactile form. Writing systems use sets of symbols to represent the sound of speech or for such things as punctuation and numerals. Here are a number of ways to define writing systems:

* a system of more or less permanent marks used to represent an utterance in such a way that it can be recovered more or less exactly without the intervention of the utterer. [From The World's Writing Systems]

* a set of visible or tactile signs used to represent units of language in a systematic way, with the purpose of recording messages which can be retrieved by everyone who knows the language in question and the rules by virtue of which its units are encoded in the writing system. [From the The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Writings Systems] * All writing systems use visible signs with the exception of the raised notation systems used by blind and visually impaired people, such as Braille and Moon. Hence the need to include tactile signs in the above definition. * In A History of Writing, Steven Roger Fischer argues that no one definition of writing can cover all the writing systems that exist and have ever existed. Instead he states that a 'complete writing' system should fulfill all the following criteria: (a) it must have as its purpose communication;

(b) it must consist of artificial graphic marks on a durable or electronic surface; (c) it must use marks that relate conventionally to articulate speech (the systematic arrangement of significant vocal sounds) or electronic programing in such a way that communication is achieved. [http://www.omniglot.com/writing/definition.htm] In his work, Edmond H. Weiss mentioned that “by International English Style I mean an approach to English that reflects an appreciation of its global uses and sensitivity to the needs of the nonnative English reader. […] Writing in an International English Style also means removing metaphors, vogue expressions, and the kind of breezy style that characterizes much business communication.” In other words, the language of written correspondence is a very specific for every culture and country, and especially if these countries use the international language of business’ and computer’s language, because there are different social classes with their beliefs and values encoded in textual codes or written correspondences such as...
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