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1302: Practice Quiz- Answer Key

Q 1. Common knowledge is information that is widely known within a society or an intellectual community; therefore, if you include common knowledge in your paper, you do not need to cite where you found that information. Answer Yes or No to the following questions:

1. In a high school class on American government, you learned about the checks-and-balances system of government, which separates power into the Judicial, Executive, and Legislative branches. Now, you are writing a paper for an introductory political science class and you mention the concept of checks-and-balances you learned in high school. Should you cite your old high school textbook? No 2. You do most of your research online and find lots of interesting websites, from which you quote several passages. After you write the first draft, you ask your older and more experienced room-mate if he knows how to cite websites. He says that websites are in the public domain and constitute common knowledge, therefore they do not need to be cited. Is this true? No Adapted from: https://www.amherst.edu/campuslife/deanstudents/acadhonesty/ Q 2. Using parenthetical citations correctly

Identify the correct parenthetical citation for this source Tannen, D. (1998). The argument culture. Toronto: Random House. a) Every issue we see discussed on television appears to be set up as an argument: “In the argument culture, criticism, attack, or opposition are the predominant if not the only ways of responding to people or ideas” (Tannen, 1998, p. 7). b) Every issue we see discussed on television appears to be set up as an argument: “In the argument culture, criticism, attack, or opposition are the predominant if not the only ways of responding to people or ideas” (p. 7). c) Every issue we see discussed on television appears to be set up as an argument: “In the argument culture, criticism, attack, or opposition are the predominant if not the only ways of responding to people or ideas” (The argument culture, 1998, p. 7).

Q 3. You have been asked to write a term paper on Can Technology Replace Teachers?. Given below are two internet articles which seem related to the topic. Evaluate the two sources using the given criteria. In the comments explain why you will be using/ not using the source for information for writing the paper. ( 5 marks)

a) Article 1

www.hackeducation.com/
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The Wrath Against Khan: Why Some Educators Are Questioning Khan Academy by Audrey Watterson 19 Jul, 2011
An Explainer Post
There's an article in this month's Wired Magazine about Khan Academy. The headline speaks volumes -- "How Khan Academy Is Changing the Rules of Education" -- as do the responses I've seen to the article. As usual, there's plenty of praise for Sal Khan and his one-man-educational-video-making machine. But there's also push-back from some quarters, particularly from educators who are highly skeptical of what Khan Academy delivers and what it stands for. Author Clive Thompson does offer some critiques of Khan Academy in his article, citing Gary Stager and Sylvia Martinez, for example. But then he waters down Constructivism, the learning theory supported by these two Khan-objectors, to the "idea that students won't really understand math unless they discover each principle on their own." For commentary on this, Thompson turns to Bill Gates who dismisses the notion as "bullshit."

That dichotomy says it all, right? Educators on one side, Bill Gates on the other. And maybe that's all I need to say about why Sal Khan has become such a lightning rod within education circles. But it's a bit more nuanced than that. So I thought I'd try to write an "explainer post," making some of the objections to Khan Academy a little clearer. Technology Replacing Teachers

If one person can create 2400 educational videos and these videos can in turn be viewed by anyone...
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