English

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: University of Cambridge, UCLES, Question
  • Pages : 6 (1542 words )
  • Download(s) : 154
  • Published : December 2, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS International General Certificate of Secondary Education

LITERATURE (ENGLISH) Paper 3 Unseen Additional Materials:
*6929925437*

0486/32
May/June 2010 1 hour 20 minutes

Answer Booklet/Paper

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST If you have been given an Answer Booklet, follow the instructions on the front cover of the Booklet. Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in. Write in dark blue or black pen. Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid. Answer either Question 1 or Question 2. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes reading the question paper and planning your answer. At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together. Both questions in this paper carry equal marks.

This document consists of 5 printed pages and 3 blank pages. DC (CB) 15833/4 © UCLES 2010

[Turn over

www.XtremePapers.net

2 Answer either Question 1 or Question 2.

EITHER 1 Read carefully the poem on the opposite page. How do the poem’s images present to you the speaker’s approach to life’s challenges and guide your feelings towards him? To help you answer this question, you might consider: • • • the various different parts of the ‘emergency kit’ and what they mean for you the ways in which the poet creates a voice and attitude for the speaker and reveals how he sees life the impact and imagery of the last four lines, and how they make you feel about the rest of the poem.

© UCLES 2010

0486/32/M/J/10

www.XtremePapers.net

3 Emergency Kit When I find myself among a laughing tribe, I know they hide something from me; I conjure up a laughter box whose button I press to outlaugh1 them all. As long as they hear their music, they leave me free; I don’t want to surrender all I have. I am a moving stump in the forest of men and if I stray into a towering company, those more than a kilometre from the undergrowth, I release stilts from my soles; I don’t want to be looked down upon by the very top ones. I collapse the long legs when I step into where giants are the required offerings to the gods of the race. I have a lifesaver installed in my body just in case I am knocked into some deep river; unless I come out alive, I will be declared evil – who ever wants his adversary2 to have the last word on him? So when a hunter stalks me to fill his bag, I call on my snake from nowhere to bite him. Folks, let’s drink ourselves to death in the party as long as we wear sponges in the tongue; let’s stay awake in our unending dream so that nobody will take us for gone and cheat us out of our lives. 1 2

outlaugh : laugh more than adversary : enemy

© UCLES 2010

0486/32/M/J/10

[Turn over

www.XtremePapers.net

4 OR 2 Read carefully this extract from a novel set in the nineteenth century. In the novel, Mr Clennam is trying to get information from the ‘Circumlocution Office’, a government department which prefers talking about things to doing anything. He wants to see an official called Mr Tite Barnacle, but instead only manages to see his son. The Barnacle family occupy most of the posts in the corrupt department. How does the writing encourage you to dislike the Circumlocution Office and its officials, and admire Mr Clennam’s ability to get around them? To help you answer this question, you might consider: • • • the way Barnacle Junior, the office and its furnishings are described how the dialogue illustrates the differences between Mr Barnacle and Mr Clennam, and why Clennam emerges victorious the ways in which the language of the whole passage is partly comical and partly angry.

Mr. Arthur Clennam made his fifth inquiry for Mr. Tite Barnacle1 one day at the Circumlocution2 Office; having on previous occasions awaited that gentleman successively in a hall, a glass case, a waiting room, and a fire-proof passage where the department seemed to keep its wind. On this occasion Mr. Barnacle was not...
tracking img