Emotinal Intelligence and Job Satisfaction

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Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction
September 20 2010 - Research from the University of Haifa found that employees with high levels of emotional intelligence are more dedicated and satisfied at work. The study surveyed 809 employees and managers in two public sector organizations and two private companies, examining the influence of emotional intelligence on factors such as organizational politics, work attitudes, formal and informal behavior, feelings of justice, and burnout. The study found that employees with high levels of emotional intelligence tended to rate the level of justice within their organizations as higher than their peers. They tended to be more satisfied with their jobs and more committed to their organizations. Factors such as burnout (suffer exhaustion), intention to leave or negligent behavior were less prevalent. Employees with higher levels of emotional intelligence also perceived the impact of organizational politics as less severe (harsh) and demonstrated (established) better coping skills, using less aggressive forms of persuasion (point of view) to influence supervisors. Researcher Dr. Galit Meisler concluded:

"This study has shown that employees with a higher level of emotional intelligence are assets to their organization. I believe it will not be long before emotional intelligence is incorporated in employee screening and training processes and in employee assessment (evaluation) and promotion decisions." Job Satisfaction Survey

A 2008 survey by The Segal Company, a New York-based compensation (return), benefits and HR consultancy found that state and local public sector workers under age 40 focused more on career (job security, opportunities, training) than their older colleagues and were also more likely to actively look for work elsewhere. Elliot Susseles, senior vice president of the Segal Company, said: "The study found that the biggest driver of turnover for employees under 40 is dissatisfaction with career...
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