Elizabeth May and Late Night Partying

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 24
  • Published : March 14, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
●●●ReadTheory.Org © 2010

Name________________
Date________________

EnglishForEveryone.Org © 2008

“Accused”
Reading Comprehension – Short Stories

Directions: Read the story. Then answer the questions below.

Elizabeth was brooding in her room. She had sought asylum there since spurious gossip about her began circulating at Seagrove Academy last week.
Not that Elizabeth had ever been considered a social butterfly. She preferred to live vicariously through the stories of her more brazen friends: late night partying, fraternizing with boys, childish pranks. Still, she had taken to being more by herself than usual since the allegations surfaced.

She was up for consideration for the highly coveted Blauvelt Award, a scholarship recognizing “academic integrity and promise.” A student had given headmaster Billings an anonymous “tip” that Elizabeth had cheated on several tests this year.

The accusations were laughable. Elizabeth had long been a stellar student at Seagrove. She lacked a natural intelligence – this was true. However, she compensated for this deficit through diligence and perseverance; she was very thorough in her studies and exhibited an almost relentless determination. Still, the accusations had given the recommendation committee pause. On Friday Elizabeth had been called to Mr. Billings’ grand office, where she was asked copious questions about her recent exams. The experience was quite traumatic. Seagrove was an elite school. Most of its students came from privileged backgrounds. This was not the case for Elizabeth. Her family had little money. She attended Seagrove on a full scholarship. The Blauvelt Award would help her family pay for college.

So, it was with the same diligence which she applied to her studies that Elizabeth planned to unmask her accuser. She opened the school directory on her bed and began combing through the names.
Seagrove was such a small and insular community. Twenty-one kids would be in her graduating class. Elizabeth knew it was inevitable that the person spreading rumors about her would come to light. It was just a matter of time.

Questions:
1) As used at the beginning of the story, which is the best synonym for spurious?
A.
B.
C.
D.

ashamed
ghastly
general
untrue

2) W hat is the meaning of “diligence and perseverance" as used in paragraph 4? A.
B.
C.
D.

efficiency and willpower
natural ability
hard work and discipline
painstaking attention

3) W hich of the following is best
described as brazen?
A. A dog chases a cat up a tree.
B. A man walks his dog during the
rain.
C. A woman steps in front of a bus
to make it to stop.
D. A little girl wins the National
Spelling Bee with hard work.

5) How is Elizabeth different than many
of her peers?
A.
B.
C.
D.

She is diligent.
She is honest.
She is not wealthy.
She likes to be alone.

4) W hy would Elizabeth have likely
been disqualified from receiving the
Blauvelt Award if caught cheating?
A. Mr. Billings said this was the
case.
B. Awards are never given to
cheaters.
C. The award is based on academic
integrity.
D. Cheating would have made the
award illegitimate for college use.

6) Seagrove Academy was
A. a school for gifted students
B. a school with many wealthy
students
C. a school where many kids lied
and cheated
D. a large school where it was hard
to get to know people

Questions (continued):
7) W hat does the reader learn about
the student who accused Elizabeth
of cheating?
I. The student is a former friend of
Elizabeth.
II. The student does not want
anyone to know who he or she
is.
III. The student is either lying or
mistaken.
A.
B.
C.
D.

8) As used at the end of the story,
which is the best antonym
for inevitable?
A.
B.
C.
D.

impossible
unmistakable
probable
certain

I only
I and II
II and III
I, II, and III

9) W hy is Elizabeth so sure that she
will learn who has accused her of
cheating?
A. Her friends will...
tracking img