Effects of Media on Children

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OF MEDIA ON CHILD

The Effects of Media Violence
Ajantha

PSY1011 Critical Thinking Assignment 1
Due Date: Apr 8th, 2013
Tutor: Your Tutor’s Name
Lab: Day and time of lab
PART 1: Does exposure to media violence increase an individual's likelihood of engaging in violent behavior? Source 1:

Huesmann, L. R., Moise-Titus, J., Podolski, C., & Eron, L. D. (2003). Longitudinal Relations Between Children’s Exposure to TV Violence and Their Aggressive and Their Violent Behavior in Young Adulthood: 1977–1992. Development Psychology, 39, 2, 201-221.

Research strategy: This journal details was found through consulting the reference list of Brad J. Bushman, PhD and L. Rowell Huesmann, PhD book (www.archpediatrics.com {2006}. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine) then searched using Monash library online data base (PsycINFO). Relevence: This journal explains

Source 2:

Hopf W. H., Huber G. L., & Weiß R.H. (2008). Media Violence and Youth Violence: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study. Journal of Media Psychology, 20, 3, 79–96.

Research strategy: Research strategy: This journal details was found through consulting the reference list of Brad J. Bushman, PhD and L. Rowell Huesmann, PhD book (www.archpediatrics.com {2006}. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine) then searched using Monash library online data base (PsycINFO). Anderson, C. A., & Bushman, B. J. (2001). Effects of violent video games on aggressive behavior, aggressive cognition, aggressive affect, physiological arousal, and prosocial behavior: A meta-analytic review of the scientific literature. Psychological Science, 12, 353-359. Research strategy: Research strategy: This journal details was found through consulting the reference list. Archives of Perspectives on psychology and the media.) then searched using Monash library online data base OvidSp

Part 2
Media violence poses a one of a threat to public health for years. In today’s world, radio, television, movies, videos, video games, and computer networks plays central role in our daily lives. Many research conducted are on the verge of finding whether media violence increase an individual’s likelihood of engaging in violent behavior. One of the earliest and distinguished theories that account for learning aggressive behavior is social learning theory developed by Albert Bandura. (Bandura, 1971) defines as the idea that we learn (eg: aggression) by observing others and imitating them. The models may be fictional or non-fictional. “ Through the observation of mass media models, the viewer comes to learn which behaviors are “appropriate” or will later be rewarded from those that are ”inappropriate” or will later be punished. Implicit in this approach is the assumption that most human behavior is voluntarily directed toward attaining some anticipated reward”.(Donnerstein & Smith, 1997). However, new theories form with the integration of the pioneer social learning theory According to Anderson and Bushman (2002), individuals who expose to media violence via passive modeling have greater risk to engage in aggressive behavior regardless of personality, family environment, genetics, or other biological contributions. Therefore, based on GAM, violent media can results in both short-term and long-term impacts on children aggression by exposing the children to the violent stimuli which causes the formation of aggressive cognition scripts, increase arousal and the creation of an aggressive affective state over time (Bushman & Anderson, 2002).

According to past researches, exposure to media violence has shown negative short-term and long-term effects of on its audiences, especially in children and adolescents (Coyne & Archer, 2005). Short-term effects are related to the increase of the aggressive behaviour in the interaction with others after watching violence on television (Coyne & Archer, 2005). Most of the research designs in examining the short-term...
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