Effective Teaching

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Effective Teaching Strategies
That Work with All Students

Handout Developed by Jane Cook
EASTCONN Staff Dev. Spec./Literacy & Technology Coach
Mill #1, 3rd Floor
322 Main Street
Willimantic, CT 06226
(860) 455-0707
jcook@eastconn.org

Table of Contents

Nine Research-Based Teaching Strategies1
Identifying Similarities and Differences1
Summarizing and Note Taking1
Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition2
Homework and Practice3
Nonlinguistic Representations4
Cooperative Learning4
Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback5
Generating and Testing Hypotheses5
Questions, Cues, and Advance Organizers6
The 10th Effective Teaching Strategy – Non-Fiction Writing7 Because Writing Matters7
Non-Fiction Writing8
Five Key Genres9
Why children need to learn non-fiction writing9

Nine Research-Based Teaching Strategies

The information below was taken from a Web site that was created by the Nebraska ESU (Educational Service Unit) Technology Affiliate Group. The site is designed to be used by teachers, providing them with technology resources that match the effective teaching strategies outlined in Classroom Instruction That Works.

Identifying Similarities and Differences

Source: http://manila.esu4.org/instructionalstrategies/stories/storyReader$7

from Classroom Instruction that Works Robert J. Marzano, Debra, J . Pickering, Jane E. Pollock, MCREL, 2001.

Summary of Research on Identifying Similarities and Differences • Guidance in identifying similarities and differences enhances students' understanding of and ability to use knowledge. • Independently identifying similarities and differences enhances students' understanding of and the ability to use knowledge. • Representing similarities and differences in graphic or symbolic form enhances students' understanding of and ability to use knowledge. • Identifying similarities and differences can be accomplished in a variety of ways: comparing, classifying, creating metaphors, and creating analogies.

[pic]
Classroom Practice in Identifying Similarities and Differences • The key to effective comparison is the identification of important characteristics. • Organizing elements into groups based on their similarities is the basis of classifying. • The key to constructing a metaphor is to realize that the two items in the metaphor are connected by an abstract or non-literal relationship.  • Analogies help us see how seemingly dissimilar things are similar, increasing our understanding of new information. The typical use a "blank is to blank" as "blank is to blank" type of comparison but can also be diagramed.

Summarizing and Note Taking

Source: http://manila.esu4.org/instructionalstrategies/stories/storyReader$8

from Classroom Instruction that Works Robert J. Marzano, Debra, J . Pickering, Jane E. Pollock, MCREL, 2001.

Summary of Research on Summarizing

Sometimes summarizing and note taking are referred to as mere "study skills". However, they are two of the most powerful skills students can acquire. Summarizing and note taking provide students with tools for identifying and understanding the most important aspects of what they are learning. • To effectively summarize, students must delete some information, substitute some information and keep some information. • To effectively delete, substitute, and keep information, students must analyze the information at a fairly deep level. • Being aware of the explicit structure of information is an aid to summarizing information. [pic]

Classroom Practice in Summarizing
• Rule-Based Strategy follows a set of rules or steps to develop a summary. • Summary Frames use a series of questions designed to highlight the critical elements for specific types of information. • Reciprocal Teaching involves summarizing, questioning,...
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