Ebola and Symptoms and Effects

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  • Topic: Ebola, Viral hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus
  • Pages : 13 (1794 words )
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  • Published : October 8, 1999
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1. INTRODUCTION

A. HISTORY OF VIRUS

1. AFRICA, ZAIRE

2. 1970

B. SYMPTOMS AND AFFECTS

1. BLEEDING, HEMORRHAGING

2. DEATH W/IN 20 DAYS

C. CURES

1. NONE KNOWN

D. INTERNATIONAL EFFORTS

2. HISTORY OF VIRUS

A. WHERE IT STARTED

1. SCIENTISTS

B. HOW IT IS SPREAD

1. NON AIRBORNE

2. BODILY CONTACT

C. WHERE IT EXISTS TODAY

3. SYMPTOMS AND EFFECTS

A. SEVERE FEVER, ABDOMINAL PAIN

1. INSIDES "MELT"

B. DEATH RATES AND TOTALS

2 SURVIVORS, BUT EBOLA VIRUS AS THE CAUSE WAS NOT

VERIFIED

4. CURES

A. NONE KNOWN CURES, RESEARCH BEING PERFORMED ON

MONKEYS.

Ebola virus is a relatively recently discovered virus, that when it infects

humans, caries with it a 50-90% fatality rate. Symptoms of this deadly virus

include Sudden Fever, Weakness, Muscle Pain, Headache, Sore Throat, Vomiting,

Diarrhea, Rash. Internal results include Limited Kidney Function, Limited Liver

Function, and Internal and External Bleeding.

The incubation period for the Ebola virus ranges from 2 to 21 days, depending

upon the method of infection. A direct inoculation of the virus into the bloodstream of

a human will bring about symptoms markedly faster than other forms of less direct

contact. The virus is present in the male's reproductive fluids, and can be transmitted

through sexual contact for up to 7 weeks after clinical recovery from the Ebola virus.

The Ebola virus can be diagnosed with laboratory testing of blood specimens

under maximum containment conditions - because of the high risk of infection to those

handling infected blood.

There is currently no treatment or vaccination available for the Ebola virus.

Transmission of the Ebola virus occurs by direct contact with the bodily fluids

of patients infected with the virus. The handling of chimpanzees that are either ill or

have died from the Ebola virus can also transmit the virus.

Any suspicion of infection with the Ebola virus should be treated with extreme

caution: immediate isolation from other patients and strict barrier nursing techniques

must be practiced. All instruments, clothing, or biological matter must be either

disposed of or thoroughly disinfected immediately.

The initial outbreaks of the Ebola virus occurred in 1976. Springing forth from

unknown origins, this virus held the nations of Zaire in fear as it quickly claimed the lives

of many of it's citizens. As this was the first recorded outbreak of the Ebola virus, the

medical community was unsure of how to handle Ebola. The level of care in Zaire during

this outbreak was very low, and as a result of the many infected victims congregated in

public areas, the virus continued to spread among the denizens of Zaire. The intervening

years have slowly produced scientific data on the nature of the virus - yet treatment is still

unavailable for those infected.

The first outbreak, as stated earlier, occurred in Zaire in 1976. This first outbreak

was followed by one in western Sudan, also in 1976. In total, these two outbreaks have

been traced to the deaths of 340 people - resulting from the 550 plus cases that were

identified in these two nations. After lying dormant for several years the Ebola virus once

again made it's presence known in 1979. Once again, no cause was identified as 34 cases

of Ebola were identified in Sudan. This occurrence brought the deaths of 22 patients -

showing a fatality rate of more than 60%, just as in the 1976 outbreaks.

The next instance of humans contracting the Ebola virus occurred in 1995. The

Ebola Zaire strain was discovered once again on April 10, 1995 when a patient

hospitalized for what was believed to be Malaria infected the surgical team during an

operation. Those involved with the operation developed symptoms indicating a viral

haemorrhagic fever disease. This outbreak...
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