Divorced from Nature

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  • Topic: A Great Way to Care, Fruit, Yale University
  • Pages : 3 (786 words )
  • Download(s) : 84
  • Published : April 6, 2013
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“Divorced From Nature”
We must learn to reconnect with nature. We must teach our children and their children to do the same. It’s imperative to our planet and future. We take for granted what our earth gives us naturally every day and shrug it off as if it were and ex-boyfriend, and worse. We’ve taught our children these ways.

We went from a time of being called in for dinner from outside with dirty, grass-stained knees and muddy hands to “text me when dinner is ready.” Research shows that nature is indeed “Very important to children’s development in every major way. Intellectually, emotionally, socially, spiritually and physically.” Quoted by Dr. Stephen R. Kellert of Yale University. A good connection with nature has benefits like creativity, problem-solving, and self-discipline. Whereas, video games and i-pad’s do not allow you to think for yourself and get creative in an outdoor environment. Some emotional benefits to staying in touch with nature are stress-reduction, reduced-aggression, and increased happiness.

It is my personal opinion that we spend way too much time in an electronic world than in our natural one. I contradict myself as I sit here typing this paper on a computer using the internet. But I feel we have lost that connection we once had years ago when people grew their own food. Now we are so reliant on these big corporations. A man by the name of Richard Louv wrote a book called “Last Child in the Woods.” Since that book was written, Louv now diagnoses people with “nature-deficit disorder” in which he would describe as reduced awareness and a diminished ability to find meaning in the life around us. It is not the children’s fault. I would put the blame on the parents and the school systems. Parents in that they are the guardian therefore it should be in their...
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