Distributive Justice

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Distributive Justice

In every nation, there are all sorts of issues within the society that can sometimes be resolved more easily or quickly than others. However, an issue like immigration is somewhat challenging and complex to many rich or more developed countries worldwide. As for the United States, the issue of undocumented immigrants has been one of the major problems that leaves the society with significant questions of justice: from whether the U.S. government immigration laws are just or unjust, to the question of immigration status that should or should not be legalized. All these kinds of questions are difficult to come to the right conclusion that would favor every single person, simply because of the fact that everybody has different opinions and perspectives on just about anything. There are generally passionate people on all sides. So for this reason, if we all had the same viewpoints going in the same direction, those questions of justice would never exist and become a complicated topic for discussion in the first place. And the reality is that, this issue of distributive justice of immigration still remains unsolved and unfinished. People all have their own ideas on the discussion and some bring in principles of justice from philosophical viewpoints to be a guide to conclude of how this problem can possibly be solved and how the society should turn out, based on their theories and beliefs.

For me, I will argue that the United State’s distribution of immigration status is unjust due to my personal perspectives on justice. I believe that since all the immigrants; legal or not, are humans like all of us, they do have human rights and so they should be treated equally, or at least, better than how they have been treated. As true as it is when considering of human rights, it seems that nowhere could human rights be more impacted than the ones on the U.S.-Mexico border. It has reached to the point where the border region becomes somewhat of, “a militarized zone” (AFSC). More importantly, while a vast number of current migrants in the U.S. survive, there are individuals out there, whose lives were unjustly taken away, “…hundreds of migrants die each year trying to cross the Mexican-U.S. border in increasingly dangerous circumstances…from the ever-increasing tally of migrant deaths to the systemic violation of the civil and human rights of border crosser’s and border communities” (AFSC). This is an extremely terrible truth of the border enforcement that has such impact on many lives of immigrants. It is a matter of killing that should not be involved in the immigration system. Since it is cruel and unjust to shoot at people for they try to run or cross the border, by catching and taking them away instead, may be more reasonable ways to do.

Moreover, we cannot forget that every life is valuable and precious in its own way, even the lives of undocumented immigrants. Although, they are considered to be illegal living in the U.S. that does not mean their lives are worth of nothing. Like every individual, these poor immigrants all have their own purpose and determinations in their lives. They determine to better their lives; not just for themselves, but also for their families. While, it is against the laws to cross the boarder and enter the U.S. without permission from the authorities, on another side of this fact, I personally have some respect for these people who fight their ways into the country and around the laws to work or reunite with their families. They are brave enough to risk their lives to do whatever they could to be in a better place in the hope that they could have opportunities to improve their standard of living.

But it seems as if the U.S. authorities do not care much of the immigrants’ lives or their purpose of coming to the country is merely to survive by finding jobs. The harsh reality is: the immigration laws have not been much different, the undocumented immigrants are still...
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