Disk Redundancy Research

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1. RAID- RAID stands for Redundant Array of Inexpensive (or Independent) Disks. 2. When you need to take the time to restore those backups and those backups could be hours or days old, resulting in data loss. RAID allows you to survive a drive loss without data loss and in many cases without any downtime. 3. RAID 0 - Never, unless the data has no value to you.

RAID 1 - If you are looking to inexpensively gain additional data redundancy and/or read speeds. A good base RAID level for those looking to achieve high uptime. RAID 5/6 - Web servers and high read environments. Generally will perform worse than RAID 1 on writes, so if your environment is write heavy or you don't need more space than is allowed on a disk with RAID 1, RAID 1 is likely your most effective option. RAID 10 - A good all around solution. It will also cost more than all the other options. It offers you additional read and write speed as well as a good level of overall redundancy. 4. This will greatly increase speeds, as you're reading and writing from multiple disks at a time. 5. You can then rebuild the array to a new drive off of the other drive with little to no downtime. RAID 1 also gives you the additional benefit of increased read performance as data can be read off any of the drives in the array 6. I buy on line from next tag I would chose to from HP DirectHP Pavilion HPE h8z PC with AMD FX-8150 eight-core processor [3.6GHz, 8MB L2/8MB L3 Cache]; 160GB SATA SSD RAID 1 (2 x 160GB HDD); 10GB DDR3-1333MHz SDRAM [3 DIMMs]; Genuine ... Price $1,299.99. Everything I need in one machine for at home use. 7. RAID Hardware is always a disk controller to which you can cable up the disk drives. RAID Software is a set of kernel modules coupled together with management utilities that implement RAID in Software and require no additional hardware.

(General, 2012)
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