Discrimination Everywhere!

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Discrimination—Everywhere!

Discrimination can be confused with other terms such as prejudice and stereotype. It is important to differentiate between the three terms so that we better understand what we deal with in society. Stereotypes are images held in our minds in regards to certain racial or cultural groups, without consideration of whether the images held are true or false. Stemming from stereotypes is prejudice. The prejudicial attitude occurs when we prejudge a person, good or bad, on the basis that the stereotypes associated with the person/group being prejudged are true. Discrimination is the combination of the terms mentioned above, but involves actually acting out with unfair treatment, directing the action towards the person/group. Prejudice and discrimination do not just occur racially, but it is found among gender, religion, culture, and geographical background. Remember that prejudice is a result of attitude and discrimination is a result of action. At one point in our lives, we have all experienced a type of discrimination. It happens to everyone, even if they happen to be the "dominating" group of their society. By dominating, I am referring to the stereotype that white, rich men dominate the society. Is it false, or true? I, myself, have experienced discrimination. One example is the wonderful experience of buying a car. It is tough enough to get up the courage to deal with the salesmen at the dealership, but even harder when you are a young female. Most salesmen I came in contact with were under the assumption that I was naïve and did not understand the process of buying a car. Four out of the five salesmen I conversed with showed me the vanity mirrors as soon as the car was opened. The safety lights, construction of the interior for safety, or simply the power of the vehicle were not discussed unless I asked. When I asked to look under the hood or had any power train questions, the look of shock on their faces was quite amusing. Before...
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