Care Value Base

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What is the care value base?

The care value base is a range of standards for health and social care. It is designed to guide the practice of professionals working in this area. The aim of the standards is to improve clients' quality of life, by ensuring that each person gets the care that is most appropriate for them as an individual.

The care value base offers guidance, and sets standards, in three main areas of health and social care: ➢ Fostering equality and diversity
➢ Fostering people's rights and responsibilities
➢ Maintaining confidentiality of information

Fostering equality and diversity

This means recognising and supporting people's individual needs.

It involves:

➢ Giving everyone the same quality of care and support This does not mean treating everyone in the same way ➢ Respecting and supporting the diversity of people's experiences, lifestyles and backgrounds

As a carer you should ensure that a client's background or circumstances do not affect the quality of care they receive. This does not mean that treating everyone in the same way. It means treating each person as an individual, taking into account their beliefs, abilities, likes and dislikes. This is known as client-centred care.

There are some terms that you must understand in relation to discrimination. Discrimination is the result of stereotyping and prejudice.

Stereotyping

If you stereotype someone, you make assumptions about them based on their age, sex, race, nationality or sexuality. For example: ➢ French people love garlic
➢ Women are bad drivers
➢ Men are only interested in one thing

Prejudice

This means liking or disliking someone not because of who they are, but because of how you feel about their lifestyle or background. It is important accept their responsibility to ensure that prejudice doesn't affect the quality of care given to clients

It means providing different care (better or worse) to some people because they are of a particular group, like Asian people, lesbians and gays, or older people

RaceDisability

The major forms of discrimination

Sex Age 2. Fostering rights and responsibilities

Rights and responsibilities go hand in hand

You must support the right of a client to choose their own lifestyle AND help them to accept their responsibilities. ➢ Your client has the right to eat unhealthy food, but you need to tell them about the health risks so they can take responsibility for their choice. ➢ Your client has the right to smoke, but they must accept their responsibilities to other people who do not wish to be affected by passive smoking

Rights and responsibilities are often laid down in legislation, codes of practice and policy documents. As a carer, you need to make sure that your clients are aware of their rights and responsibilities in care settings. Clients have a right to:

➢ Not be discriminated against
➢ Confidentiality
➢ Their own beliefs and values
Clients have a responsibility to:
➢ Not discriminate against others
➢ Respect the confidentiality of others
➢ Do no harm to others

3. Confidentiality of information

This means that any information clients give you must be private and confidential, whether it is: Verbal
Written
Electronic (on a computer)
You need to be aware of what you say to other carers and clients and also who has access to client files.

Maintaining confidentiality of information is an important part of caring. You need to think carefully before you talk about your colleagues and clients, and ask yourself whether this person really needs to know what you're about to tell them. Clients can expect you not to discuss their details with anyone else without their consent and they won't trust or respect you if you do.

There are times when you need to share confidential information, for example when a...
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