Delinquency Prevention

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Delinquency Prevention
Dana Leshock
August 19, 2012
CCJS 350

Prevention 1 Every single person that is living in the United States today is and has been affected by juvenile crime. It affects parents, neighbors, teachers, and families. It affects the victims of crime, the perpetrators, and the bystanders. While delinquency rates have been decreasing, rates are still very high in many cities. There have been numerous programs that have attempted to lower this juvenile rate, but, some can be very successful, while many others have minimal or no impact. It is essential to determine the efficacy of different programs, and to see what works and what does not. In this way, the most successful programs can continue to be implemented and improved, while those that do not work are discontinued.

The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act is the single most important piece of federal legislation affecting youth in juvenile justice systems across the country. It is the primary vehicle through which the federal government sets standards for state and local juvenile justice systems, and provides direct funding for states, research, training and technical assistance, and evaluation. Since the original enactment of the JJDPA in 1974, the periodic reauthorizations have been very contentious, as the Act's opponents have sought to weaken its protections for youth, reduce prevention resources, and encourage the transfer of youth to the adult criminal justice system. National Institute for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Program is a United States Federal Agency that was created pursuant to the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974. The institute aims to encourage, coordinate, and conduct research and evaluation of juvenile justice and delinquency prevention activities. It acts as a clearinghouse and information center that will collect, disseminate, publish, and distribute information on juvenile delinquency to all public and private agencies, institutions, justice system agencies.

Prevention 2

Additionally, the institute conducts national training programs of juvenile related issues, and provides technical assistance and training to federal, state, and local governments, courts, corrections, law enforcement, probation, public and private agencies, institutions, and individuals, in the planning, establishment, funding, operation, or evaluation of juvenile delinquency programs.

A number of different types of programs currently exist. Of those programs that do get involved with the delinquent, after the occurrence has happened, the behavior will tend to be less successful, since by that point antisocial habits are well developed. More effective programs are ones that intervene before the onset of delinquent behavior and prevent that behavior. By getting involved in children’s lives early, later crime can be effectively reduce prevention programs positively impact the general public because they stop this crime from happening in the first place. And there are even some prevention programs that are more successful than others. One aspect of exceptionally successful prevention programs is their comprehensive nature. Programs that are more holistic prevent future crime better because they deal with various aspects of a child’s life, not just a single one. Two programs that I have seen to be effective when the juvenile is at a young age would be the early intervention and comprehensiveness which are the home visitation programs and Head Start. Both of these programs have shown incredible results by targeting specific risk factors that lead to delinquent behavior. Once these risk factors are lessened, the...
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