Death Be Not Proud

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Kayla McPeak
South University Online
February 23, 2013
Instructor: Kathy Knecht
English 1002: Week 1 Assignment 2

“Death Be Not Proud”
John Donne
Death be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;
For those whom thou think’st thou dost overthrow
Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure, then from thee much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
Rest of their bones, and soul’s delivery.
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy, or charms can make us sleep as well,
And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then?
One short sleep past, we wake eternally,
And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.

Part A: My Emotions
When I first read this, it was a little depressing, just because it was talking about death in general. However, when I read it again I had a better understanding of where the author was coming from, and how he felt about death. I had an understanding and open-mindedness emotion during this poem for the simple fact that so many people avoid even talking about death, let alone writing about it. However, having said that, I think this poem that should help people not be so fearful of dying.

Part B: Connecting Specific Language with Your Emotions
Fill in the chart below for your poem. Please refer to the example given on the Assignment page. Each cell of the chart will expand as you type, so don’t worry about space!

Death Be Not Proud: Words/Phrases| My Emotions| Explanation| Line 2: Mighty and Dreadful| Strong, agony, horrible, frightened| All of the emotions I get from those two words are awful. If you read the whole line, it’s to reassure you (the reader) that death is none of those things.| Line 3: For those whom thou think’st thou dost...
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